Cement House

Officers, N.C.O.s and Men of the 1st Battalion, Buried in Cement House Cemetery

This cemetery contains 3576 Great War burials here, of which 2408 (two thirds) are unidentified. There are a small number of Second World War burials here too.

This cemetery is actually still in use today, occasionally for groups of graves which have to be moved from other locations for various reasons, and also it is where the remains of soldiers who continue to be found in the region are buried.

Of the 1185 named burials 1 Officer and 4 other ranks are soldiers of the 1st Battalion, killed in 1914.

…. use this link to get a full list of all Soldiers buried in this Cemetery

Three of the men buried here were killed during the action at Audregnies on 24th August (Lieutenant Campbell, L/Cpl. Bone and Pt. Trent) whilst the other two (Privates Jones and Thorpe) died of wounds a few days later, undoubtedly as a result of the same action.

Use the links below to read a little more about each man and see where he is buried.

 

Lieutenant Charles Arthur CAMPBELL – “D” Coy.

 Grave:  XVIII.A.18.  Killed in Action: 24 August 1914  Age: 23

Personal: Charles was born in London on 3rd June 1891, the son of Arthur and Annabella Campbell of Wye House, Downview Rd., West Worthing, Sussex. He had a younger brother, Cyril, born in 1892.

Charles was educated at Downside School from 16th September 1901 as one of the youngest boys. and the Royal Military College, Sandhurst, and passed out in December 1909. The 1911 Census (RG 14/6684) has him listed as a ‘Gentleman Cadet‘ at Sandhurst. He does not appear to have been married as it is his father who, in 1917, is requesting his medals to be sent to him.

Lt. Campbell’s Grave – XVIII.A.18.

Military Service: Currently his Army records are unavailable, and do not appear to have survived the Second World War bombing. Charles was gazetted 2nd Lieutenant in the Cheshire Regiment on 11th October 1911 and promoted Lieutenant in April 1914. At the outbreak of the War he was serving in Ireland with the 1st Battalion.

Charles Campbell’s Medal Index Card shows that at the outbreak of War and entered France 16th August 1914. The War Diary does not a date for when he joined the Battalion.

He was killed in action on 24th August during the action at Audregnies. From the Regimental Roll it is apparent his was under the command of Captain Ernest Rae-Jones, of “D” Company and the two Officers died within a few yards of each other either side of the Audregnies to Elouges road.

In his book “Ever Glorious” Bernard Rigby describes the action at about 5 p.m. on the afternoon of 24th August:
Maj. Chetwynd-Stapleton, now the senior regimental officer, realised the perilous position of ‘B’ Company, bearing in mind the importance of Audregnies for the security of the left flank. He decided first to try to find Lt.Col. Boger and so at about 5 p.m. he set off up the road towards the right flank. Before doing so he left orders with Lt. Campbell to find out what had happened to Capt. Shore.

The major’s first encounter was with Sgt. Raynor who was just beginning the second withdrawal of his 9 platoon. Both learned much from each other, the consequence of which was that Sgt. Raynor was ordered to continue his retirement and Maj. Chetwynd-Stapleton returned to HQ. Here he discussed the situation with Capt. Dyer of A Company. Chetwynd-Stapleton was under the impression that Shore’s two platoons were still holding Audregnies. In his sortie to find out what had happened to Shore, Campbell was killed.”

read more about the life and military career of Lieutenant Charles Arthur Campbell and his family 

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Lance Corporal 7474 William F. BONE – “C” Coy.   

Grave: XVIII.A.25.   Killed in Action: 24 August 1914  Age: 28

L/Cpl Bone’s Grave – XVIII.A.25.

Personal: William was born in Congleton, Cheshire in February 1886, the eldest son of James and Ellen Bone of Oak Cottages, Styal, Cheshire. He had 5 younger siblings, Percy, Frank, Harold, Edith and Mabel. (1901 Census 13/3320)

At the time of his enlistment he was employed as a ‘Blacksmith’s Striker‘. When he joined the Cheshires he was 5’ 4¼” tall (1.63 m.), weighed 112 lbs. (8 st. 0lbs.) had a ‘fresh’ complexion, grey eyes and light brown hair. His religion was Wesleyan Methodist.

George married Edith May Hyde, at the Church of the Ascension, Lower Broughton, Lancaster, on 7th April 1910.

The 1911 Census (RG 14/23990) shows the family living at 1 Chestnut Street, Broughton, Salford, and William is employed as a “Railway Shunter” for the Lancashire and Yorkshire Railway Co.

Before the War they were living at Harmsworth Street, Seedley, Salford, Lancashire. George and Edith had two children James Harry (b. 17th November 1910) & Percy William (b. 23rd November 1911) and with effect from 26th April 1915 she was awarded an Army pension of 18/6d (£0.925) per week for all of them (i.e. equivalent to about £75 today – 2020).

In March 1916 William’s widow, Edith, finally received his total effects, amounting to £3 17s 9d (£3.88, or about £260 today) and four years later a War Gratuity of £5 (£225 today). The family later moved to of 10 Forge Terrace, Ketley, Wellington, Shropshire, and in the 2nd quarter 1918 Edith re-married Herbert D. Baron.

Military Service: William originally enlisted in the Cheshire Regiment at Stockport on 4th April 1904, aged 18 years 1 month. His original terms of service were 3 + 9 (i.e. 3 years active service + 9 years reserve). He was assigned to the 2nd Battalion on 15th June 1904 and was posted to Wellington Barracks, Lichfield on September 22nd. He was re-assigned to the 1st Battalion on 15th November 1904.

He was promoted to Lance Corporal (unpaid) on 14th May 1906 and paid from 29th August 1906. William transferred to the Army Reserve after 3 years on 3rd April 1907, and returned to live at 5 Lower Park Street, Congleton, Cheshire. From subsequent newspaper reports (see below) he remained an active Reservists in the 5th Battalion.

William’s Medal Index Card shows that as a Reservist he was recalled to the Regiment at the outbreak of War and entered France on 16th August 1914. He was reported missing from the Battalion at Audregnies on 24th August. Evidence of his death was received by the W.O. from an “unofficial source” (identity disc). In all he served a period of 10 years 143 days with the Regiment.

As the articles reproduced below show, there was some doubt originally whether Pt. Bone had been killed and it was thought (or hoped) that he had been taken prisoner, along with so many of his comrades, but confirmation came later:

The Alderley and Wilmslow Advertiser 21st October 1914:
STYAL SOLDIER MISSING. In the list of missing belonging to the 1st Cheshire Regiment who have been missing since 23rd and 24th August, the days of the fighting at Mons, is Lance Corporal William Bone, of Harmsworth Street, Seedley, son of Mr James Bone of Styal. Lance Corporal Bone went with the Expeditionary Force, and was engaged in the early days of the war. His many friends in Styal hope that he is one of the prisoners in the concentrated camp in Germany. Mr Bone is married and has two children.”

The Alderley and Wilmslow Advertiser 2nd April 1915
Lance Corporal William Bourne (sic), of whom nothing has been heard since the Battle of Mons, is the son of Mr James Bourne (sic), of Oak Cottages, Styal. He was a reservist in the 5th Cheshires, but when called up on the outbreak of the war was transferred to the 1st Cheshires. He is a married man, and has a wife and two children, both boys, living at Seedley. Official notification that he was missing was received in August, and since then no information regarding him has been received. This week his wife has received official papers to fill up in order that she may receive her pension as a widow.

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Private 8019 William JONES (A.R.) – “D” Company   

Grave: XVIII.A.20.   Died of wounds: 30 August 1914   Age: n/k

Personal: William was born in St Martin’s Parish, Hereford and at the time of his recall as a Reservist at the outbreak of War was living in Hereford. At the time of his enlistment he was employed as a “Hotel Waiter“.

This is a common name, but the name of his father and place of birth, and approximate age from his enlistment date, below, mean he is most likely the son of Henry (General Labourer) and Ellen (née Crook ?) Jones, living at 27 Belmont Street, Haywood, Herefordshire, in 1891 (Census RG 12/2058).

If this is the case, William was born in 1883 and had an older brother, Christopher, and 3 younger sisters, Imelda, Cecilia and Gertrude.

On 20th March 1915 his father, Henry, received the total of his effects, amounting the £3 17s 9d (£3.89 – equivalent to about £300 today – 2020). Four years later he received a War Gratuity of £5 (about £225 today).

Pt. Jones’ Grave – XVIII.A.20.

Military Service: William originally enrolled in the 2nd Battalion, at Hereford, on 25th September 1905 and would have served for 3 years with the Battalion in India, before being transferred to the Reserve List for the remaining 9 Years of his Service.

William’s Medal Index Card shows that he entered France on 16th August 1914 and died of wounds on 30th August.

William was one of the 213 names of Officers, NCOs and men reported Killed, Wounded or Missing in the actions of 24th & 26th August, reported in the War Diary, and died of wounds received at Audregnies on the 30th.

Private Lavin of ‘A’ Company was wounded in the Action at Audregnies.

He wrote: “One of our own R.A.M.C. officers bandaged me, and the next day I was taken with a number of other English to a hospital in Audregnies.”

From the 25th August to 2nd September four Officers (Jackson, Dyer, Joliffe and Elliott) of the Cheshires and Gallagher of the 4th Dragoon Guards remained at the Hospital, which was part of Convent and staffed by nuns and had been turned into a Hospital, by the Germans, after the Battle.

During this time, at 9am on 30th August 1914, Private 8019 W. Jones, of  ‘D’ Company (see below), was the second death at the hospital. (Private 8316 Fred Thorpe also of ‘D’ Company who on the 29th August 1914 had been the first death at the hospital.)

William’s ‘Register of Soldier’s Effects‘ record confirms this. He would probably have been buried in Audregnies Churchyard, which was one of the locations from which men were re-buried in Cement House after the War.

Almost 500 French graves in the original Plots XVI, XVII and XVIII were removed in 1922 and the space vacated has been filled in the intervening years by graves brought in from communal cemeteries and churchyards in the area when their maintenance in these locations could no longer be assured.

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Private 8315 Frederick Edward THORPE (A.R.) –               “D” Company.   

Grave: XVIII.A.21.   Died of wounds: 29 August 1914   Age: 29

Personal: Fred was born in St Anne’s, Manchester, in October 1884 (according to his Service Record). He had a sister, Bertha, who was named as his only next of kin. A brother, Charlie, had been killed in the “South African War” (Boer War)

Her marriage certificate to William Henry Upton (5th August 1916, Union Baptist Chapel, Rochdale Road, Manchester) shows that their father was William Thorpe, an Engineer, but was ‘Deceased’. As Bertha was named next-of-kin it does not seem likely that Fred married. [William Upton was a L/Cpl. in the 25th (Reserve) Battalion, Manchester Regiment.]

At the time of his enlistment he was employed as a ‘Salesman‘. He was 5’ 8½” tall (1.74 m.), weighed 139 lbs. (9 stone 13 lbs) had a ‘fresh‘ complexion, brown eyes and brown hair. His stated religion was Church of England.

In March 1920 Bertha received his total effects amounting to £3 5s 9d (£3.28 – equivalent to about £130 today – 2020). Four year later she received a further £5 War Gratuity (£225 today). The delay could have been because the “War Pensions Committee” had tried and failed to find Fred’s widow and “believed she may have remarried“.

Part of Fred’s Service Records shows that he had been in a relationship with a Mary Garrett and they had a daughter, Mary Edith. The same document confirms both of his parents were dead, no names given. Mary Garratt’s address is recorded as “20 The Shipyard, Ledsam Street, Ladywood, Birmingham“. (This address was the site of a murder in 1912, following which Thomas Killoran was convicted.)

Pt. Thorpe’s Grave – XVIII.A.21

Military Service: Fred enlisted at Birkenhead, Cheshire on 5th November 1906, aged 22 years 0 months. At the time he was already serving with the 3rd Battalion, South Lancs. Regiment. His terms of service were 7 + 5 (i.e. 7 years active service + 5 years reserve).

He was posted to the 1st Battalion on 8th February 1907, and promoted to Lance Corporal (unpaid) on 29th May 1907 (paid from 5th July). Two years later, on 13th July 1909, he was made up to full Corporal before being transferred to the 2nd Battalion for a tour of duty which commenced on 22nd February 1910.

He reverted to Private on 7th October 1910 and 2 days later was posted back to the 1st Battalion. Fred ended his service and was transferred to the Army Reserve ‘B’ List on 5th November 1913 (List ‘A’ 2 weeks later). He had attained a 2nd Class Certificate of Education in March 1907, and passed his training for inclusion in the Mounted Infantry at Longmoor Camp, Hampshire, on 1st February 1912.

His Medal Index Card shows that as a Reservist Fred was recalled to the Regiment at the outbreak of War and entered France on the 16th August 1914 and died of wounds on 29th August.

Fred was reported missing on 24th August, following the Battalion’s heroic stand at Audregnies.

His records state he received a “perforating wound of the lungs” and was taken prisoner and admitted to the ‘ambulance of St Bernard’s Boarding School, Audregnies‘ where he subsequently died on the 29th. (War Office Form: B 103, January 1915).

From the 25th August to 2nd September four Officers (Jackson, Dyer, Joliffe and Elliott) of the Cheshires and Gallagher of the 4th Dragoon Guards remained at the Hospital, which was part of Convent and staffed by nuns, and had been turned into a Hospital, by the Germans, after the Battle.

Private 8316 Fred Thorpe, of ‘D’ Company, on the 29th August 1914, was the first death at the hospital. The following day Private 8019 W. Jones, also of  ‘D’ Company (see above), was the second to die at the hospital.

He would probably have been buried in Audregnies Churchyard, which was one of the locations from which men were re-buried in Cement House after the War.

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Private 7606 Edmund Ernest TRENT (A.R.) –                       “B” Company   

Grave: XVIII.A.24.   Killed in Action: 24 August 1914   Age: 30

Personal: Edmund was born in Parkstone, Poole, Dorset in July 1884 (registered in the December quarter). He was the eldest son of 16 children of Edmund Childs and Emily Jane (née Dominey) Trent. Edmund had an older sister, Beatrice, and his younger siblings were Ethel, Gedeon, Daisy, Elsie, Cecil, Gilbert, William, Percy, Kathleen, Grace and Gwendoline (plus three more who died).

In 1901 the family were living at Victoria Crescent, Branksome, Dorset. (1901 Census 13/1978). By 1911 (RG 14/12286) the enlarged family had moved to Hazelmere Warren Road, Parkstone, Dorset. The Census records Edmund’s occupation as ‘Grocers Storeman‘.

At the time of his enlistment he was employed as a ‘Carter‘. He was 5’ 6″ tall (1.68 m.), weighed 129 lbs. (9 stone 3lbs) had a ‘fresh‘ complexion, hazel eyes and light brown hair. His stated religion was Wesleyan Methodist.

Edmund married Edith Jane Burt on 29th September 1913 at Kingston, Dorset and they lived at Chapel House, East Street, Corfe Castle, Dorset. He had one son, Edmund Arthur, born on 23rd September 1914 – just one month after Edmund was killed.

In March 1915 Edmund’s widow received his total effects amounting to £3 1s 9d (£3.08 equivalent to about £200 today – 2020). On 23rd June 1915 Edith received notification of a pension of 15/- (75p) per week, with effect from 26th April, for herself and their child (this would amount to about £60 per week today – 2020). In August 1919 she received a further £5 (£225 today) War Gratuity.

Edith remarried Arthur Margetts on 24th November 1920 at St Nicholas, Parish Church, Studland, Dorset.

Pt Trent’s Grave – XVIII.A.24

Military Service: Edmund enlisted at Poole, Dorset on 20th June 1904, aged 19 years 11 months. At the time he was already serving with the 3rd Battalion South Lancs. Regiment. His terms of service were 3 + 9 (i.e. 3 years active service + 9 years reserve).

On 20th June 1904 he arrived in Chester and then was posted to Aldershot on 19th August and on to Lichfield on 20th September.

On 26th December 1905 he was posted to India, returning home on 1st May 1907. He received a Good Conduct Badge.

His Medal Index Card shows that as a Reservist he was recalled to the Regiment at the outbreak of War and entered France on the 16th August 1914 and was reported missing on 24th August following the Battalion’s heroic stand at Audregnies, where he fought on the left of the line under Captain Shore. He was later deemed to have been killed in action “on or since” that date. In total he had served 10 years 66 days with the Regiment.

He would probably have been buried in Audregnies Churchyard, which was one of the locations from which men were re-buried in Cement House after the War.

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