La Ferte-sous-Jouarre H-I

Officers, N.C.O.s & Men of the 1st Battalion, Commemorated on the La Ferte-sous-Jouarre Memorial

Surnames: H to I:

La Ferte-sous-Jouarre Memorial commemorates 1 Officer and 45 NCOs and men from the Original 1st Battalion, Cheshire Regiment, all of whom were killed in August and September 1914 and originally buried on the battlefields.

As the War progress over the same ground the identities of those buried were lost and their graves are now “Known Unto God“.

Cheshire names on the Ferte-sous-Jouarre Memorial

The La Ferte-sous-Jouarre Memorial commemorates 3838 officers and men of the British Expeditionary Force who died in August, September and the early part of October 1914 and who have no known grave.  

[Unfortunately Cheshire Regiment names were badly weathered at the time of the last visit.]

 

Lt. Frost’s name on the Memorial

40 of the 1st Battalion commemorated here fell at Audregnies on 24th August 1914. This includes Lieutenant Kingdon Tregosse FROST (left) whose body was subsequently identified as being buried at Wiheries Communal Cemetery.

[See also Cpl. 6932 Thomas HEWITT (A.R.) below]

Of the remaining 5 1st Battalion casualties, one fell at Le Cateau and four on the Aisne.

about  La Ferte-sous-Jouarre Memorial and other information

All of the Cheshire men commemorated on La Ferte-sous-Jouarre Memorial, were with the original 1st Battalion who sailed for France on 14th August 1914.

Read more about .. about those with surnames H to I by CLICKING the names below.

 

  ….. the men of the original 1st Battalion – Surnames: A to C

  ….. the men of the original 1st Battalion – Surnames: D to G

  ….. the men of the original 1st Battalion – Surnames: J to M

  ….. the men of the original 1st Battalion – Surnames: N to U

  ….. the men of the original 1st Battalion – Surnames: V to Z

 

Private 9507 John HAGGERTY – ‘C’ Company

Stone: 13 a    Killed in Action:  24 August 1914      Age: 27

Personal: According to the SDGW database John was born in 1885 in St Peter’s Parish, Stalybridge, Cheshire (though no birth record has been found). He was the son of John (Professional Swimmer) and Catherine Haggerty and had an older sister, Ellen, and four younger siblings, Garrard, Alice, Richard and James. In 1891 (Census RG 12/3292) the family were living with grandparents, Garret and Ellen Haggerty, at 132 Brierley Street, Duckinfield, Cheshire.

Ten years later (1901 Census RG 13/3798) the family had moved to 4 Ramsbottom Road, Stalybridge. In 1911 (Census RG 14/25420) John’s family had moved again to 85 George Street, Blackpool, Lancashire, but John had moved out. [If the estimate of his enlistment date (below) is correct, he would have been serving in Ireland with the 1st Battalion.]

The “Register of Soldiers’ Effects” shows that in May 1916 £9 3s 8d [£9.18 – equivalent in value to about £630 today – 2020] was returned to John’s father. In September 1919 she also received a War Gratuity of £5 [about £225 today]. On 13th December 1917 John’s mother, “Mrs Julia Haggerty” was awarded a pension of 5s. per week, reducing to 3s 6d on 12th February 1918. [5s (25p) = about £15 and 3s 6d (17p) about £9 today]

Pt Haggerty’s name on the Memorial

Military Service: John enlisted in the 1st Battalion, Cheshire Regiment, at Hyde, Cheshire.

His Army records are unavailable, however, his Service Number suggests he enlisted in July 1910, on a 7+5 term of service (i.e. 7 years active service plus 5 years reserve). (e.g. Pt. 9505 J. Cross enlisted on 12th July 1910)

As a serving soldier John was stationed with the 1st Battalion in Londonderry when War was declared, before sailing from Belfast on the SS Massilia for Le Havre on 14th August 1914. He arrived in France on 16th August, confirmed by his Medal Index Card. As a member of ‘C’ Company, he  saw action at Audregnies on the 24th August, on the right of the line under Captain W.E.L.R. Dugmore.

John was one of 12 men from his Company killed in action during that action and now has no known grave. [It is, of course, possible that he is one of the men of the Battalion buried in Audregnies Cemetery, “Known Unto God“.] In total he had served 5 years 211 days with the Colours.

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Private 9879 Francis James HEFFERAN – ‘A’ Coy

Stone: 13 a   Killed in Action:  24 August 1914      Age: 20

Personal: Francis (Frank) was born at Wilmslow, Cheshire, in the December quarter 1893, the oldest son of John (Foreign Correspondent) & Anne Maria (née Grundy) Hefferan. Frank had 3 younger sisters, Margaret Mary, Marian (died in 1897, aged about 3 months) and Ursula Mary, and a younger brother, John Henry Marcellins (see Footnote below).

In 1901 (Census RG 13/3319) the family was living at 1 Chapel Lane, Wilmslow. However, father, John, died a few months after the Census was taken in April 1901. The five children of the family were left orphaned when their mother, Anne, also died in July 1909 (buried on 30th).

In 1911 (Census RG 14/21559) Frank and his siblings, Margaret, John and Ursula, had gone to live with their widowed aunt, Edith Elizabeth Mary Kerley, their late mother’s sister, and her two children, at 5 Church Road, Northenden, Cheshire. Frank was employed as “Brazilian Consuls Clerk“. [Sadly, a year later, Frank’s sister, Margaret, died aged 15-16.]

The “Register of Soldiers’ Effects” shows that in July 1917 £4 11s 10d [£4.59 – equivalent in value to about £260 today – 2020] was returned to Frank’s sister, Ursula. In April 1920 Bernard George Kerley (Frank’s cousin) received a War Gratuity of £5 [about £225 today].

Pt Hefferan’s name on the Memorial

Military Service: Frank enlisted in the 1st Battalion, Cheshire Regiment, at Chester. His Service Papers are not available, but his Service Number would suggest he enlisted in early 1914.

After initial training he was posted to join his Battalion in Londonderry , Ireland. With the rest of the Battalion Frank sailed from Belfast on the SS Massilia for Le Havre on 14th August 1914.

Frank arrived in France on 16th August, confirmed by his Medal Index Card. As a member of ‘A’ Company, he  saw action at Audregnies on the 24th August, on the left of the line under Captain A. J. L. Dyer. He was one of 8 men from his Company killed in action and has no known grave. [It is, of course, possible that he is one of the men of the Battalion buried in Audregnies Cemetery, “Known Unto God“.]

Frank’s younger brother, Pt. 302718 John Henry Hefferan, served in ‘C’ Coy. 8th (Reserve) Battalion, Manchester Regiment.

Pt. 302718 John Henry Hefferan died on 26th February 1917 in the Military Hospital at Ripon, Yorkshire, and is buried in Grave G. 167, Ripon Cemetery.

Both brothers are commemorated on the Northenden War Memorial and St Wilfrid’s Church, Northenden, Memorial.

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Corporal 6932 Thomas James HEWITT (A.R.) –          ‘C’ Company

Stone: 13 a    Killed in Action:  24 August 1914      Age: 28

Personal: Thomas was born in Riddley, Chester, in the September quarter 1886, the son of George (Clogger/Sawyer, later Agricultural Labourer) and Jane (née Davenport) Hewitt. He had 11 older brothers and sisters, Harriett, Samuel, Elizabeth, Emily, Martha, Jane, Albert, George, Mary, Arthur and Alice, and 3 younger siblings, Minnie, Percy and Ernest.

In 1891 (Census RG 12/2857) the family were living at Nantwich Road, Riddley. Ten years later (1901 Census RG 13/3363) Thomas’ parents were at Audley Hill, Ridley, but only 10 year old Ernest was still at home with them. Fifteen year old Thomas was lodging at Chesterton Farm, Riddley, working as a “Cattleman” for Robert Ankers, Farmer. (Census RG 13/3363). [After the War his parents moved again to Church View, Bunbury, Tarporley, Cheshire.]

When Thomas enlisted in September 1902 he stood 5 ft. 4½ ins. [1.64 m.] tall, weighed 8 st. 4 lbs. [52.6 kgs.], had a ‘fair‘ complexion, blue eyes and light brown hair. He also gave his age as 18 years 4 months, whereas he was probably only just 16. His stated occupation was “Farm Labourer“.

On 8th October 1908 Thomas married Emily Annie Tong at The Registry Office, Nantwich, Cheshire. They had 4 children, Walter John (born 25th August 1908), Thomas (b. 27th April 1910), Alice (b. 16th December 1911) and Phyllis Nellie (b. 11th October 1913, died aged 3 in 1916).

For some reason the “Register of Soldiers’ Effects” shows Thomas’ date of death as 26th April 1915. His total assets amounted to £24 5s 3d (£24.26 – equivalent in value to about £1700 today – 2020) but £17 15s (£17.75 – about £1200 today) was returned to the MoD. The rest, £6 10s 3d (£6.51 – about £500 today) was paid to Thomas’ widow and children in May 1916. In August 1919 she also received a War Gratuity of £6 [about £280 today].

On 10th May 1915 she was granted a Pension of £1 3s per week for herself and their 4 children. [i.e. £1.15 per week equates to about £95 today.] In the March quarter 1916  Emily Annie re-married Edward Hughes and they moved to live at Hillside Cottage, Little Barrow, Cheshire.

Cpl. Hewitt’s name on the Memorial

Military Service: Thomas enlisted in the 2nd Battalion, Cheshire Regiment, at The Castle, Chester, on 18th September 1902. His terms of service were 3 + 9, i.e. 3 years Active Service followed by 9 years in the Reserve.

Thomas was promoted to Lance Corporal on 15th December 1903 before being posted to the 1st Battalion on 14th November 1904.

After being transferred to the Army Reserve on 23rd January 1905, Thomas was mobilised on 4th August 1914, posted to the 1st Battalion, In Londonderry, the following day. He was promoted to Corporal on 8th August 1914. With the rest of the Battalion Thomas sailed from Belfast on the SS Massilia for Le Havre on 14th August 1914 and arrived in France on 16th August, confirmed by his Medal Index Card.

As a member of ‘C’ Company, Thomas  saw action at Audregnies on the 24th August, on the right of the line under Captain W.E.L.R. Dugmore. He was one of 12 men from his Company killed in action during that action and now has no known grave.

Strangely, though, Thomas’ Service Papers fail to acknowledge this as, on 18th September 1914 he was “Re-engaged from the Army Reserve for a further period of 4 years“. The next entry reads: “Presumed death of missing man – 26-4-15“. Had this been his date of death he would not be commemorated on La Ferte-sous-Jouarre Memorial, but on Le Touret Memorial.

Thomas’ wife wrote to the War Office on 8th September 1914: “Sir, Would you please inform me of the whereabouts of my husband. I have not heard from him since 22nd August. Perhaps he is not able to write but I am very anxious to hear of him, so would you please be kind enough to enquire if he is quite well and let me know to oblige me. If there is any charge I will send it on at once. Mrs Hewitt.

She wrote again on the 18th September: “Sir, I am again writing about my husband. I have never heard from him since 21st August that was before he had been in any fighting. Since that date I have never heard of him. I have read the papers closely every day but his name has never been in either the wounded or missing. There are several in the fighting from round hear (sic) and they have all heard within the last fortnight from them I am left hear (sic) with 4 children and can’t get a card. I have wrote several letters and a parcel to my husband through the War Office in London and have not received them back. I am sure my husband would have wrote if he could. I am, yours respectfully, Mrs Hewitt.

It was not until the following May (1915) that Thomas’ Service Record noted that he had been: “Missing from Bn. in the field since 24-8-14” and “Evidence of death received by W.O. from unofficial source“. The next, very faded, note is most intriguing as it appears to say: “Buried at Wiheries“. (see below left)

Confirmation of the note is found elsewhere in Thomas’ Papers, when on 29th October 1924 a letter was sent to the Chairman, Imperial War Graves  Commission  (later Commonwealth War Graves  Commission ) confirming that Thomas was indeed buried in Wiheries Cemetery. (see below right)

 

 

 

 

 

 

If this is indeed the case, Thomas must occupy one of the two remaining “Unknown” Graves in Wiheries Communal Cemetery. (pictured left)

[N.B. The Author has been in contact with the C.W.G.C. to start the process of changing Thomas’ record and identify the actual burial ground for another one of the 1st Battalion.]

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Private 7579 George William HOLBROOK (A.R.) –          ‘D’ Company

Stone: 13 a   Killed in Action:  24 August 1914      Age: 32

Personal: George was born in the September quarter 1882 at Moor Street, Spondon, Derby.  He was the oldest son of William Enoch (Colour Work Labourer) and Fanny (née Hicklin) Holbrook and had an older sister, Elizabeth, and 7 younger siblings, Alfred Lewis, John Henry, Sarah Ann, Maud Mary, Marian Vera, Frank and George Reginald.

In 1891 (Census RG 12/2726) the family were still at the Moor Street address. Ten years later (1901 Census RG 13/3212) the growing family has moved to 28 Coxon Street, Spondon, and George was working as a “Railway Plate Layer“.

At the time of his enlistment in 1904 George stood 5 ft. 6½ ins [1.66 m.] tall, weighed 10 st. 5 lbs. [65.8 kgs.], had a ‘fair‘ complexion, blue eyes and brown hair.

The “Register of Soldiers’ Effects” shows George’s father, William, had £2 5s 4d [£2.26 – equivalent to about £160 today]  returned to him in June 1916.

Pt Holbrook’s name on the Memorial

Military Service: George enlisted in the 2nd Battalion, Cheshire Regiment, at Derby, on 8th June 1904, aged 21 years 10 months. His terms of service were 3 + 9, i.e. 3 years Active Service followed by 9 years in the Reserve.

After initial training George was posted India on 20th September 1904, serving at Wellington Battery and Secunderabad, returning on 14th March 1912.

On his transfer to the Reserve on 15th March 1912 George had served 7 years 340 days with the Colours. He served another 2 years 102 days on Reserve before being recalled to join the 1st Battalion on 14th August 1914. Just 11 days later he had been killed in action.

He had sailed from Belfast with the 1st Battalion, entering France on 16th August, confirmed by his Medal Index Card. As a member of ‘D’ Company, George saw action at Audregnies on the 24th August, on the right flank under Captain E.R. Jones or Captain W.S. Rich. After just 9 days in France, George was one of 20 men from his Company killed in action and has no known grave. In total he had served 10 years 78 days with the Regiment.

George’s Service Record noted that he had been: “Missing from Bn. in the field since 24-8-14” and “Evidence of death received by W.O. from unofficial source (Identity Disc)“. After just 9 days in France, George was one of 20 men from his Company killed in action and has no known grave. In total he had served 10 years 78 days with the Regiment.

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L/Corporal 10271 Albert HOLT – ‘B’ Company

Stone: 13 a   Killed in Action:  24 August 1914      Age: 19

Personal: Albert was born in June 1894 (baptised 20th) at 29 Harrold Street, Bradford, LancashireHe was the son of Ephraim (Driller) and Prudence (née Goulding, formerly MacGarrigan) Holt and had two older brothers, William and James, an older sister, Alice, and a younger sister, Mary Jane. [He also had 7 half-siblings from Prudence’s first marriage to William MacGarrigan, and a further 6 from Ephraim’s first marriage to Mary Tute.] 

In 1901 (Census RG 13/3321) the extended family was living at 8 Bentley’s Buildings, Altrincham. Ten years later (1911 Census RG 14/46841) Albert, his mother, Prudence, and his sister, Mary Jane, were lodging in the home of John Goulding (probably Prudence’s brother) at 121 College Road, Bradford, Lancashire. Albert was employed as a “Punch Minder“.

When he enlisted in 1913 Albert stood 5 ft. 6½ ins [1.66 m.] tall, weighed 9 st. 2½ lbs. [58.3 kgs.], had a ‘fresh‘ complexion, grey eyes and ‘dark‘ hair.

The “Register of Soldiers’ Effects” shows Albert’s father, Ephraim, had £1 19s 8d [£0.23 – equivalent to about £115 today] returned to him in November 1917. In November 1919 he also received a War Gratuity of £5 [about £225 today]. On 1st July 1917 Ephraim was also awarded a Pension of 10 s. per week [i.e. 50p – worth about £30 today]. At the time he was living at 18 John Street, Openshaw, Manchester.

L/Cpl Holt’s name on the Memorial

Military Service: Albert attested in the 1st Battalion, Cheshire Regiment, at Altrincham, Cheshire, on 20th November 1913. His terms of service were 7 + 5, i.e. 7 years Active Service followed by 5 years in the Reserve.

He stated his age as 20 years 169 months, although probably a year younger. Albert was already enlisted in the 3rd (Service) Battalion, Manchester Regiment.

He was posted to join the Battalion in Londonderry just 5 days later. [He never saw his family again.] Albert was promoted to Lance Corporal (unpaid) on 3rd March 1914, but was paid from the 13th.

As a Regular Soldier serving with the 1st Battalion in Londonderry, Albert sailed from Belfast with the Battalion, entering France on 16th August, confirmed by his Medal Index Card. As a member of ‘B’ Company he saw action at Audregnies on the 24th August, in the centre of the action under Captain J.L. Shore.

He was one of the 14 men killed in action during that Battle and now has no known grave. Including his 9 days in France Albert had served just 277 days with the Regiment.

Albert’s older brothers both served in the Great War, William in the Royal Navy and James in the Merchant Navy.

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Private 7308 Harry HOUGHTON (A.R.) – ‘D’ Coy

Stone: 13 a   Killed in Action:  24 August 1914      Age: 25 ?

Personal: According to his Service Papers (below) Harry was born in November 1885, but his Birth Record would states June quarter 1889. He was the oldest son of Joseph Rimmer (Gamekeeper) and Sarah Houghton and had and older brother, Albert, and 3 younger sisters, Jane, Ellen and Mary. In 1901 (Census RG 13/3333) the family was living at Keeper’s Bridge, Norton, Cheshire.

When he enlisted in 1903 Albert stood 5 ft. 3 ins [1.60 m.] tall, weighed 8 st. 1 lbs. [51.2 kgs.], had a ‘pale‘ complexion, blue eyes and light brown hair.

In the September quarter 1911 Harry married Nellie Smallwood, in Congleton. They had one daughter, Ethel, born on 16th March 1912. After he was confirmed as having died (see below) Nellie was awarded a Pension of 15 s. per week for herself and Ethel (i.e. 75 p. is equivalent to about £55 today – 2020).

The “Register of Soldiers’ Effects” shows Harry had £11 11s 11d [£11.60 – equivalent to about £800 today] returned to his family in August 1916. One-third of this was paid to his widow and the other ⅔ placed in trust for their daughter. In September 1919 Nellie also received a War Gratuity of £5 [about £225 today] (now Mrs Concliffe as she had re-married, Frank Concliffe, in the September quarter 1918). At that time she was living at  25 Green Street, Sandbach, Cheshire.

Pt. Houghton’s name on the Memorial

Military Service: Harry attested in the 2nd Battalion, Cheshire Regiment, at Chester, Cheshire, on 8th December 1903.  He stated his age as 18 years 1 month. His terms of service were 3 + 9, i.e. 3 years Active Service followed by 9 years in the Reserve. This was later extended to 7 years ‘Active’ on 3rd December 1906.

Harry was posted to the 2nd Battalion in Madras, India, on 19th December 1906 and was returned to Section ‘B’ Reserve on his return on 27th January 1911.

As a Reservist Harry rejoined the 1st Battalion at the outbreak of War and sailed from Belfast with the Battalion, entering France on 16th August, confirmed by his Medal Index Card. As a member of ‘D’ Company, Harry saw action at Audregnies on the 24th August, on the right flank under Captain E.R. Jones or Captain W.S. Rich.

After just 9 days in France, Harry was one of 20 men from his Company killed in action and has no known grave. In total he had served 10 years 78 days with the Regiment. Harry’s Service Record noted that he had been: “Missing from Bn. in the field since 24-8-14“. Prisoner of War, War Office Communique No 115 (October 1915) stated he had been captured and confirmed he was a prisoner of war. Accordingly a separation allowance was paid to his wife.

In May 1916, however, the Army Council decided that Harry had: “Died on or since 24/8/1914” and his next of kin informed. Harry’s records were later amended to read: “Error refers to another man“.

After just 9 days in France, Harry was one of 20 men from his Company killed in action and has no known grave.

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L/Corporal 4829 Edward HUGHES – ‘D’ Company

Stone: 13 a   Killed in Action:  24 August 1914      Age: 41

Personal: Edward was born at Neston, Cheshire, in the August/September 1874 (baptised 6th September). He was the eldest son of Joseph and Sarah Ann [Annie] (née Cottrell) Hughes. Joseph died in the June quarter 1876 and in 1881 (Census RG 11/3568) Edward was living with his widowed mother and younger brother, George Harry, at his grandparents’ home (Edward and Mary Cottrell) in Neston. Edward had another younger brother, Thomas – possibly a twin of George.

In the June quarter 1888 Edward’s mother, Annie, re-married Roger Henry Bellis and they had two children, Mary Elizabeth and Joseph Henry. They moved to live at 2 Crystal Terrace, Northop, Flint, Wales (1891 Census RG 12/4607) but the same Census (RG 12/2871) shows Edward working on the farm of Edward Mealor and family at Ness, Cheshire.

In 1901 Edward’s family were still in Flint, but no record can be found of him in that Census. It could be that as a serving soldier he was in South Africa (Second Boer War). The 1911 Census (RG 14/21870) shows Edward enumerated with the 3 Officers and 217 other ranks of the 1st Battalion at Chester Castle.

The “Register of Soldiers’ Effects” shows Edward’s mother, Annie, had £13 14s 1d [£13.70 – equivalent to about £950 today – 2020] returned to her in June 1916. In September 1919 she also received a War Gratuity of £5 [about £225 today]. Annie died on 17th March 1922, hence the inscription on his CWGC headstone:  “Stepson of Roger Henry Bellis of “Oak Dene,” Chester Road, Flint, and son of the late Annie Bellis (formerly Hughes)“.

L/Cpl Hughes’ name on the Memorial

Military Service: Edward attested in the Cheshire Regiment, at Chester, Cheshire. His Service Papers are not available but his very early Service Number (4829) indicates he enlisted in August/September 1894 (e.g. Service Number 4629 joined on 13th February 1894 and 5041 joined on 9th April 1895.)

The 2nd Battalion saw active service in South Africa from 1900 to 1902, during the Second Boer War.

2nd Battalion – Fort Johannesburg 1902

After the end of the war, 376 officers and men of the Battalion returned home in October 1902, and were stationed at Aldershot.

The 3rd (Militia) Battalion was also embodied for active duty in South Africa, with 450 men reported as returning home after the end of the war in September 1902.

On the official list of men of the Original 1st Battalion, Edward is not identified as a Reservist.

He would, therefore, have sailed from Belfast with the Battalion, entering France on 16th August, confirmed by his Medal Index Card. As a member of ‘D’ Company, Edward saw action at Audregnies on the 24th August, on the right flank under Captain E.R. Jones or Captain W.S. Rich.

After just 9 days in France, Edward was one of 20 men from his Company killed in action and has no known grave. If the above assumptions are correct he must have extended his terms of service to almost 20 years with the Colours.

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Private 10089 William Henry HULL – ‘D’ Company

Stone: 13 a   Killed in Action:  24 August 1914      Age: 20

Personal: William was born in the December quarter 1893 at Faulkner Street, Harpurhey, Manchester, the son of William (Joiner) and Elizabeth Ann (née Carter) Hull. He had a twin brother, Frederick Arthur, and 4 younger siblings, George Vincent, Mary Josephine, John Joseph and James Albert (1911 Census RG 14/24217). At that time the family were living at 46 Anglesea Avenue, Moston Lane, Harpurhey, Lancashire, and William was working as a “Twist Cotton Piecer“.

In 1901 (Census RG 13/3594) William and his twin, Frederick, were living with his uncle’s family, James and Teresa Carter and their 5 children, at 5 Bank Street, Leigh, Lancashire. Their parents were at the 46 Anglesea Avenue address (above) (RG 13/3775). William was enumerated as being in the Navy, which might explain the arrangements for their older children. [The 1939 Register shows them still there then, aged 70 and 65 years.]

The “Register of Soldiers’ Effects” shows William’s father, William Snr., had £13 17s 10d [£13.89 – equivalent to about £220 today – 2020] returned to him in February 1917. In October 1919 he also received a War Gratuity of £5 [about £225 today].

Pt Hull’s name on the Memorial

Military Service: William attested in the 1st Battalion, Cheshire Regiment, at Hyde, Cheshire. His terms of service were 7 + 5, i.e. 7 years Active Service followed by 5 years in the Reserve.

His Service Papers are not available but his Service Number (10089) indicates he enlisted about March 1913 (e.g. Service Number Pt. J. Evans, 10064 joined on 3rd February 1913).

As a serving soldier William was stationed with the 1st Battalion in Londonderry when War was declared, before sailing from Belfast on the SS Massilia for Le Havre on 14th August 1914. He arrived in France on 16th August, confirmed by his Medal Index Card.

As a member of ‘D’ Company, William saw action at Audregnies on the 24th August, on the right flank under Captain E.R. Jones or Captain W.S. Rich. After just 9 days in France, he was one of 20 men from his Company killed in action on that day and has no known grave.

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