La Ferte-sous-Jouarre D-G

Officers, N.C.O.s & Men of the 1st Battalion, Commemorated on the La Ferte-sous-Jouarre Memorial

Surnames: D to G:

La Ferte-sous-Jouarre Memorial commemorates 1 Officer and 45 NCOs and men from the Original 1st Battalion, Cheshire Regiment, all of whom were killed in August and September 1914 and originally buried on the battlefields.

As the War progress over the same ground the identities of those buried were lost and their graves are now “Known Unto God“.

Cheshire names on the Ferte-sous-Jouarre Memorial

The La Ferte-sous-Jouarre Memorial commemorates 3838 officers and men of the British Expeditionary Force who died in August, September and the early part of October 1914 and who have no known grave.  

[Unfortunately Cheshire Regiment names were badly weathered at the time of the last visit.]

 

Lt. Frost’s name on the Memorial

40 of the 1st Battalion commemorated here fell at Audregnies on 24th August 1914. This includes Lieutenant Kingdon Tregosse FROST (left) whose body was subsequently identified as being buried at Wiheries Communal Cemetery.

Of the remaining 5, one fell at Le Cateau and four on the Aisne.

about  La Ferte-sous-Jouarre Memorial and other information

All of the men commemorated on La Ferte-sous-Jouarre Memorial, were with the original 1st Battalion who sailed for France on 14th August 1914.

Read more about .. about those with surnames D to G by CLICKING the names below.

 

  ….. the men of the original 1st Battalion – Surnames: A to C

  ….. the men of the original 1st Battalion – Surnames: H to I

  ….. the men of the original 1st Battalion – Surnames: J to M

  ….. the men of the original 1st Battalion – Surnames: N to U

  ….. the men of the original 1st Battalion – Surnames: V to Z

 

Private 8540 (Charles) Sidney DALE (A.R.) –             ‘D’ Company

Stone: 13 a    Killed in Action:  24 August 1914      Age: 25

Personal: Sidney was born in the June quarter 1889 at Melford Road, Lawshall, Bury St. Edmund’s, Suffolk, the youngest child of Frederick (Agricultural Labourer) and Eliza (née Smith) Dale. He had 6 older siblings, George, Annie, Maria, Ellen, Emma and Arthur. In 1901 (Census RG 13/1746) the family were living at Audley End Road, Lawshall, Bury St. Edmund’s.

At the time of his enlistment, aged 18, in 1907, Sidney stood 5 ft. 6 ins [1.68 m.] tall, weighed 9 st. 4 lbs. [59 kgs.], had a ‘fresh‘ complexion, grey eyes and brown hair. At that time his stated occupation was “Labourer“.

The “Register of Soldiers’ Effects” shows that in March 1916 £4 19s [£4.95 – equivalent in value to about £340 today – 2020] was returned to Sidney’s father, Frederick. In August 1919 he also received a War Gratuity of £5 [about £225 today].

With effect from 21st May 1919 Sidney’s mother, Eliza, also received a Pension of 5 shillings per week, for life. [£0.25 – about £13 today] They were still living at Audley End Road, Lawshall, Bury St. Edmund’s.

Pt Dale’s name on the Memorial

Military Service: Sidney enlisted in the 1st Battalion, Cheshire Regiment, at Bury St Edmund’s, Suffolk, on 1st July 1907, aged 18 years 3 months. His Terms of Service were 7 + 5, i.e. 7 years Active Service + 5 years Reserve.

Accordingly, Sidney was transferred to the ‘B’ Reserve on 1st July 1914. “He had been employed as an Officer’s servant for about 3 years.” – probably to Captain Mahony.

As a Reservist, he was recalled at the outbreak of War, on 5th August 1914, only 5 weeks after leaving his Active Service. He sailed from Belfast with the 1st Battalion, entering France on 16th August, confirmed by his Medal Index Card. As a member of ‘D’ Company, James  saw action at Audregnies on the 24th August, on the right flank under Captain E.R. Jones or Captain W.S. Rich.

At first Sidney was posted as “Missing from the Bn. since 24.8.14, In the Field.” It was not until 26th January 1916 that it was deemed by the War Office that he had been killed in action on that date. In October 1914 and again in November 1914 Sidney’s mother had written to the War Office asking for news of his whereabouts. It is to be assumed that she had to wait over a year before her son’s death was confirmed.

After just 9 days in France, Sidney was one of 20 men from his Company killed in action and has no known grave. [It is, of course, possible that he is one of the men of the Battalion buried in Audregnies Cemetery, “Known Unto God“.] In total, Sidney served 7 years 55 days with the Colours.

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Private 7831 James DIXON (A.R.) – ‘D’ Company   [Alias: DICKINSON]

Stone: 13 a    Killed in Action:  24 August 1914      Age: 31

Personal: The SDGW Record states that James was born at West Kirby, Cheshire. He seems to have used two surnames; his ‘private‘ life (marriage, children) is under the name of ‘Dickinson‘, whilst his Service Records use ‘Dixon‘.

James Dickinson was born in the June quarter 1883 (Birkenhead District). When James married Margaret Hughes, in the September quarter 1904, the marriage certificate is under the surname ‘Dickinson‘.

In 1891 (Census RG 12/2862) James, his mother, Hannah, older brothers, Ellis and Albert, and younger brother, Harry, were lodging with the Shickell family at 20 Union Terrace, Chester. (There are, however, alternative ‘James Dickinson‘s named in the same area, and the 1901 Census throws doubt on whether this is the relevant Dickinson family.)

The 1911 Census shows James as one of the 25 Officers and 1021 Other Ranks stationed with the 2nd Battalion at The Ridge, Jubbulpore, India, under the surname ‘Dixon‘.

The “Register of Soldiers’ Effects” shows that in April 1916 £2 17s 10d [£2.89 – equivalent in value to about £200 today – 2020] was returned to his widow, Margaret, for “self and children“. In August 1919 she also received a War Gratuity of £5 [about £225 today].

Pension Records shows that from 7th April 1916 his widow, Margaret Dickinson (née Hughes), was awarded a pension of 18s 6d per week [£0.92 – about £65 today] for herself and 2 children, William (born 3rd November 1904) and Mary (b. 14th October 1913) both surname ‘Dickinson‘. At that time they were living at 40 Price Street, Birkenhead.

Pt Dixon’s name on the Memorial

Military Service: James enlisted in the 2nd Battalion, Cheshire Regiment, at Birkenhead, Cheshire. Currently his Army records are unavailable, however, his Service Number suggests he enlisted in early 1905, on a 7+5 term of service (i.e. 7 years active service plus 5 years reserve).

He served in India at Jubbulpore, probably until 1912, before being transferred to the Reserve List.

As a Reservist, James was recalled at the outbreak of War, on 5th August 1914. Despite originally being in the 2nd Battalion, he rejoined the 1st in Londonderry. He sailed from Belfast with the 1st Battalion, entering France on 16th August, confirmed by his Medal Index Card. As a member of ‘D’ Company, James  saw action at Audregnies on the 24th August, on the right flank under Captain E.R. Jones or Captain W.S. Rich.

After just 9 days in France, James was one of 20 men from his Company killed in action and has no known grave. [It is, of course, possible that he is one of the men of the Battalion buried in Audregnies Cemetery, “Known Unto God“.]

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Private 9156 Edward EATON – ‘C’ Company 

Stone: 13 a    Killed in Action:  24 August 1914      Age: 24

Personal: Edward was born in April/May 1890 (baptised 7th May) at 3 Hatton Street, Macclesfield, Cheshire.  He was the son of Charles (Silk Weaver) and Priscilla (née Morton) Eaton and had 5 older siblings, William (died aged 4 in 1874), Charles, Florence, Lillie and Annie (1891 Census RG 12/2816). Ten years later (1901 Census RG 13/3312) the family had moved to no. 3 Hatton Street. The 1911 Census of Ireland shows 21 year old Edward enumerated with his Battalion in Belfast.

When he enlisted, aged 19, in January 1909, Edward stood 5 ft. 9¾ ins. [1.77 m.] tall, weighed 9 st. 7 lbs. [60.3 kgs.], had a ‘fresh‘ complexion, light brown eyes and light brown hair. His stated religion was Church of England. He was then employed as an “Engine Cleaner“.

The “Register of Soldiers’ Effects” shows that in May 1917 £7 16s 4d [£7.82 – equivalent in value to about £450 today – 2020] was returned to Edward’s family, divided equally between sisters Florence (now Mottram) and Annie (now Ward), and brother Charles. (Sister Lillie had died in 1904; father, Charles, died in 1906, and mother, Priscilla, in 1909.) In October 1919 Charles also received a War Gratuity of £5 [about £225 today].

Pt Eaton’s name on the Memorial

Military Service: When Edward enlisted in the 1st Battalion, Cheshire Regiment, at Macclesfield, Cheshire, on 19th January 1909, he had been serving in the 3rd (Service) Battalion for 5 months [Pt. 8221, enlisted 20th August 1908]. 

After 8 months training Edwards was posted to Belfast on 24th September 1909. His Terms of Service were 7 + 5, i.e. 7 years Active Service + 5 years Reserve.

Regimental Band c. 1910

For 2 short periods in 1910 and 1911 Edward was appointed a “Bandsman“, but reverted to Private after about 3 months on each occasion.

On 1st October 1913 Edward’s progress in the band was assessed as: “Intelligent, hard-working and reliable. A fair instrumentalist on the bassoon and bass clarionet [sic]. Progressing well on the violin.”

In October 1910 and again October 1911 Edward was examined and found fit for service in India, but the posting did not proceed.

As a serving soldier Edward was stationed with the 1st Battalion in Londonderry when War was declared, before sailing from Belfast on the SS Massilia for Le Havre on 14th August 1914. He arrived in France on 16th August, confirmed by his Medal Index Card. As a member of ‘C’ Company, he  saw action at Audregnies on the 24th August, on the right of the line under Captain W.E.L.R. Dugmore.

Edward’s Service Papers state that on 19th September 1914 he was “Reported Missing“. Later this was changed to “Died on or since 24.8.14“. His family were not informed until 10th October 1916.

Edward had, of course, been killed in action, one of 12 men from his Company to lose his life that day and now has no known grave. [It is, of course, possible that he is one of the men of the Battalion buried in Audregnies Cemetery, “Known Unto God“.] In total he had served 5 years 211 days with the Colours.

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Private 8036 John Nicholas FEENEY (A.R.) –                 ‘D’ Company

Stone: 13 a    Killed in Action:  24 August 1914      Age: 27

Personal: John was born in St Joseph’s Parish, Stockport, Cheshire, in July 1887 (baptised 24th). In 1891 (Census RG 12/2797) he was living with his mother, Mary, and older sisters, Mary and Maggie, at 14 Low Bank Side, Stockport.

About 1899 Mary married John Little, and the 1901 Census (RG 13/3287) records John with that surname, living at 43 Great Egerton Street, Stockport. John was working as a “Cotton Bobbiner“. When he enlisted, however, John reverted to his birth surname.

The 1911 Census shows John as one of the 25 Officers and 1021 Other Ranks stationed with the 2nd Battalion at The Ridge, Jubbulpore, India,

The “Register of Soldiers’ Effects” shows that in February 1916 £3 5s 7d [£3.28 – equivalent in value to about £230 today – 2020] was returned to his mother, Mary. In August 1919 she also received a War Gratuity of £5 [about £225 today]. From 27th June 1916 she also received a Pension of 5 shillings a week [i.e. £0.25 – about £18 today].

Pt Feeney’s name on the Memorial

Military Service: John enlisted in the 2nd Battalion, Cheshire Regiment, at Stockport, Cheshire. His Army records are unavailable, however, his Service Number suggests he enlisted in 1905, on a 7+5 term of service (i.e. 7 years active service plus 5 years reserve).

He served in India at Jubbulpore, probably until 1912, before being transferred to the Reserve List.

As a Reservist, John was recalled at the outbreak of War, on 5th August 1914. Despite originally being in the 2nd Battalion, he rejoined the 1st in Londonderry and sailed from Belfast with the Battalion, entering France on 16th August, confirmed by his Medal Index Card. As a member of ‘D’ Company, James  saw action at Audregnies on the 24th August, on the right flank under Captain E.R. Jones or Captain W.S. Rich.

John was one of 20 men from his Company killed in action during that Battle and now has no known grave. [It is, of course, possible that he is one of the men of the Battalion buried in Audregnies Cemetery, “Known Unto God“.]

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Private 7879 Arthur FROST (A.R.) – ‘C’ Company

Stone: 13 a    Killed in Action:  24 August 1914      Age: 27

Personal: Arthur was born in Bollington, Macclesfield, Cheshire. He was the eldest son of Samuel (Police Constable) and Elizabeth (née Hodgkinson) Frost. The 1891 Census (RG 12/2157) shows Arthur and his mother living at the home of her widowed mother, Ann Hodgkinson, on High Street, Wolstanton, Staffordshire.  

Old postcard of Styal Mill

Ten years later (1901 Census RG 13/3320) Arthur was living with both parents at Styal Cross, Styal, Cheshire. He then had 4 younger siblings, Walter, Lizzie, Annie and Bertha. Fourteen year old Arthur was working as a “Cotton Weaver“, no doubt in Quarry Bank Mill (now a well know heritage site). [In total Samuel and Elizabeth had 8 children, but only 3 grew to adulthood – Arthur, Walter and Bertha.]

The 1911 Census shows Arthur as one of the 25 Officers and 1021 Other Ranks stationed with the 2nd Battalion at The Ridge, Jubbulpore, India,

The “Register of Soldiers’ Effects” shows that in January 1916 £3 6s 5d [£3.32 – equivalent in value to about £230 today – 2020] was returned to Arthur’s father, Samuel. In July 1919 he also received a War Gratuity of £5 [about £225 today].

By then his parents had moved to 401 Hadfield Road, Hadfield, Derbyshire, but after Elizabeth died in 1919 Samuel moved to 32 Mottram Moor, Hollingworth, Manchester. 

Pt Frost’s name on the Memorial

Military Service: Arthur enlisted in the 2nd Battalion, Cheshire Regiment, at Crewe, Cheshire. His Army records are unavailable, however, his Service Number suggests he enlisted in mid-1905, on a 7+5 term of service (i.e. 7 years active service plus 5 years reserve).

He served in India at Jubbulpore, probably until 1912, before being transferred to the Reserve List.

As a Reservist, Arthur was recalled at the outbreak of War, on 5th August 1914. Despite originally being in the 2nd Battalion, he rejoined the 1st in Londonderry and sailed from Belfast with the Battalion, entering France on 16th August, confirmed by his Medal Index Card. As a member of ‘C’ Company, he  saw action at Audregnies on the 24th August, on the right of the line under Captain W.E.L.R. Dugmore.

Arthur was one of 12 men from his Company killed in action during that Battle and now has no known grave. [It is, of course, possible that he is one of the men of the Battalion buried in Audregnies Cemetery, “Known Unto God“.]

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Private 7511 Edward GOOCH (A.R.) – ‘B’ Company

Stone: 13 a    Killed in Action:  24 August 1914      Age: 33

Personal: Edward was born in Sotterby, Suffolk, in March 1881 (1881 Census RG 11/1899). He was the son of Edward (Agricultural Labourer) and Agnes (née Turner) Gooch and had an 3 older sisters, Ellen, Rosetta and Cecilia, and 9 younger siblings, George, Lilian, Frederick (see Footnote below), Ethel. Elsie, Beatrice, Gertrude, Arthur Victor (see Footnote below) and Ivy Emma.

In 1891 (Census RG 12/1489) the family were living at 6 South Wood Lane, Sotterby. In 1901 (Census RG 13/1769) the family had moved to Bramford, Suffolk, but Edward had left home by then.

The 1911 Census shows Edward as one of the 25 Officers and 1021 Other Ranks stationed with the 2nd Battalion at The Ridge, Jubbulpore, India,

The “Register of Soldiers’ Effects” shows that in February 1916 £3 9s 2d [£3.46 – equivalent in value to about £240 today – 2020] was returned to Edward’s father, Edward, Snr. In August 1919 he also received a War Gratuity of £5 [about £225 today]. At that time Edward’s parents were living at 64 Surbiton Row, Ipswich, Suffolk.

Pt Gooch’s name on the Memorial

Military Service: Edward enlisted in the 2nd Battalion, Cheshire Regiment, at Manchester on 19th April 1904, on a 3+9 term of service (i.e. 3 years active service plus 9 years reserve).

He was posted to India on 20th September 1904 and on 1st July 1906 extended his period of Active Service to 8 years and served until 1st February 1912, before being transferred to the Reserve List.

As a Reservist, Edward was recalled at the outbreak of War, on 5th August 1914. Despite originally being in the 2nd Battalion, he rejoined the 1st in Londonderry and sailed from Belfast with the Battalion, entering France on 16th August, confirmed by his Medal Index Card. As a member of ‘B’ Company he saw action at Audregnies on the 24th August, in the centre of the action under Captain J.L. Shore.

Initially Edward was “Missing from Bn. in the Field from 24-8-14“. His father wrote to the War Office on 4th November 1914 asking for any news of his son. Finally: “Evidence of death received by W.O. from unofficial source (Identity Disc)” and the family informed.

After just 9 days in France, Edward was one of 14 men from his Company killed in action during the Battle at Audregnies and now has no known grave. [It is, of course, possible that he is one of the men of the Battalion buried in Audregnies Cemetery, “Known Unto God“.] In total he had served 10 years 128 days with the colours.

Edward’s younger brother, Cpl. 14975 Frederick Gooch, served with the Cheshire Regiment in France from 26th September 1915.

Another younger brother, Pt. 32708 Arthur Victor Gooch, served in France with the 1/5th Battalion, Prince of Wales’s Volunteers (South Lancashire) Regiment. Even though he was only 19 years old at the end of the War, Arthur was awarded the Military Medal.

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Private 7597 Jacob GRIFFITHS (A.R.) – ‘D’ Company

Stone: 13 a    Killed in Action:  24 August 1914      Age: 27

Personal: Jacob was born in Whitchurch, Shropshire, in February 1887 (baptised on 19th). He was the son of Jacob and Sarah Ann Griffiths.

In 1901 (Census RG 13/2555) Jacob was living with his father at 4 Folly Lane, Whitchurch. Ten years later (1911 Census RG 14/23765) Jacob, employed as a “Bricksetters Labourer“, was living with his widowed mother, Sarah, younger brother, Thomas, and Thomas’ wife, Lillian Elsie (née Issitt), at 41 Hancock Street, Rusholme, Manchester.

When he enlisted in 1904 Jacob stood 5 ft 5 ins [1.65 m.] tall, weighed 8 st. 6 lbs. [53.5 kgs.], had a ‘fair‘ complexion, grey eyes and brown hair. His stated religion was Church of England.

On 6th April 1912 Jacob married Amy Hines at Christ Church, Bradford, Lancashire, and they had one daughter, also Amy, born on 3rd July 1914. Jacob would have had little time with them before he was sent to France. At the time of their marriage they were living at 11 Wellington Street, Bradford, and Jacob was employed as a “Labourer“. [In the June quarter 1919 Amy re-married Percy Ward in Wolstanton, Staffordshire.]

The “Register of Soldiers’ Effects” shows that in January 1916 Jacob’s widow, Amy (now Mrs. Ward), was returned £2 10s 7d [£2.53 – equivalent in value to about £175 today – 2020]. In September 1919 she also received a War Gratuity of £5 [about £225 today]. At that time she and their daughter, also Amy, was living at 30 Hyde Road, Gorton, Lancashire.

Effective from 15th October 1915 she had already been awarded a Pension of 15 shillings per week for herself and Amy. [£0.75 = about £60 today]

Pt Griffiths’ name on the Memorial

Military Service: Jacob enlisted in the 2nd Battalion, Cheshire Regiment, at Shrewsbury, Shropshire. on 17th June 1904, on a 3+9 term of service (i.e. 3 years active service plus 9 years reserve). He was already serving with the 3rd (Reserve) Battalion, Shropshire Light Infantry.

He was, however, posted to the 1st Battalion on 12th November 1904.

From 28th February 1906 Jacob served 1 year and 63 days in India, returning on 2nd May 1907. On 16th June 1907 he was returned to the Reserve List.

As a Reservist, Jacob was recalled at the outbreak of War, on 5th August 1914. Despite originally being in the 2nd Battalion, he rejoined the 1st in Londonderry and sailed from Belfast with the Battalion, entering France on 16th August, confirmed by his Medal Index Card. As a member of ‘D’ Company, James  saw action at Audregnies on the 24th August, on the right flank under Captain E.R. Jones or Captain W.S. Rich.

Amy, Jacob’s wife, wrote to the War Office in November 1914 asking for any news of him. Finally: “Evidence of death received by W.O. from unofficial source (Identity Disc)” and she was informed.

Jacob was one of 20 men from his Company killed in action during the Battle at Audregnies and now has no known grave. [It is, of course, possible that he is one of the men of the Battalion buried in Audregnies Cemetery, “Known Unto God“.] In total he had served 10 years 69 days with the colours.

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