La Ferte-sous-Jouarre A-C

Officers, N.C.O.s & Men of the 1st Battalion, Commemorated on the La Ferte-sous-Jouarre Memorial

Surnames: A to C:

La Ferte-sous-Jouarre Memorial commemorates 1 Officer and 45 NCOs and men from the Original 1st Battalion, Cheshire Regiment, all of whom were killed in August and September 1914 and originally buried on the battlefields.

As the War progress over the same ground the identities of those buried were lost and their graves are now “Known Unto God“.

Cheshire names on the Memorial

The La Ferte-sous-Jouarre Memorial commemorates 3838 officers and men of the British Expeditionary Force who died in August, September and the early part of October 1914 and who have no known grave.  

[Unfortunately Cheshire Regiment names were badly weathered at the time of the last visit. More up to date photos would be appreciated.]

Lt. Frost’s name on the Memorial

40 of the 1st Battalion commemorated here fell at Audregnies on 24th August 1914. This includes Lieutenant Kingdon Tregosse FROST (left) whose body was subsequently identified as being buried at Wiheries Communal CemeteryOf the remaining 5, one fell at Le Cateau and four on the Aisne.

about  La Ferte-sous-Jouarre Memorial

All of the men commemorated on La Ferte-sous-Jouarre Memorial, were with the original 1st Battalion who sailed for France on 14th August 1914.

Read more about .. about those with surnames A to C by CLICKING the names below.

  ….. the men of the original 1st Battalion – Surnames: D to G

  ….. the men of the original 1st Battalion – Surnames: H to I

  ….. the men of the original 1st Battalion – Surnames: J to M

  ….. the men of the original 1st Battalion – Surnames: N to U

  ….. the men of the original 1st Battalion – Surnames: V to Z

 

Private 6879 Joseph ARNOTT (A.R.) – ‘B’ Company  [Also recorded as Joseph ARNDT]

Stone: 13 a     Killed in Action:  24 August 1914      Age: 30

Personal: Joseph was born in the September quarter 1883 in West Derby, Lancashire, (under surname ‘Ardnt‘). He was the oldest son of Elias and Margaret (née Parry) Ardnt and had 7 younger brothers and sister: Herman (b. 1886), Edith Ellen (1887), Sarah Louise (1889), Thomas Prythertch (1892), Ernest (1895), William Owen (1896) and Albert (1898). After Margaret died in 1903, Elias re-married, Clara Ellen Cole in 1923.

In 1891 (Census RG12/2950) the family was living at 10 Millard Grove, Everton, Lancashire. Elias was employed as a “Canvasser – Sewing Machines“. The 1901 Census (RG 13/3492) shows Joseph employed as a “Labourer” living at 35 West Street, West Derby, Lancashire. However, his mother is named as Margaret Jackson, a widow.

In the December quarter 1906 Joseph married Sarah Ann Bennett (under surname ‘Ardnt‘) and they had three children, Albert Edward, Jessie and Reginald. The 1911 Census shows Joseph, Sarah Ann and 7 month old Albert Edward lodging with the Moss family at 4 Laburnum Street, Blackpool, Lancashire. Joseph is working as an “Insurance Agent“. By this time they had changed their surnames to the more Anglicised “Arnott“.

After his death Joseph’s total effects amounting to £2 5s 8d [£2.28 – equivalent to about £160 today – 2020] were returned to his widow in April 1916. In September 1919 she also received a War Gratuity of £5 [about £225 today]. Effective from 24th January 1916 Sarah also received a pension of £1 0s 6d [£1.02 – worth about £70] per week for herself and their 3 children. At that time she was living at 4 Grey Place West, Leamington, Warwickshire.

Pt. Arnott’s name on the Memorial

Military Service: Joseph enlisted in the Cheshire Regiment at Birkenhead, Lancashire. His Service Papers have not survived but Joseph’s Service Number (6879) suggests an enlistment date in mid-1902, e.g. Pt. 6989 W. Bowers enlisted 6th November 1902, also at Birkenhead, on a 3 years Active + 9 years Reserve engagement. There is every reason to suppose Joseph would have done the same, which would have entailed overseas service in India.

As a Reservist he was recalled at the outbreak of War and joined the Battalion in Londonderry before sailing from Belfast on the SS Massilia for Le Havre on 14th August 1914. He arrived in France on 16th August, confirmed by his Medal Index Card. As a member of ‘B’ Company he saw action at Audregnies on the 24th August, in the centre of the action under Captain J.L. Shore.

At the end of the day Joseph was one of 14 men from his Company killed in action and has no known grave. [It is, of course, possible that he is one of the men of the Battalion buried in Audregnies Cemetery, “Known Unto God“.]

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Private 7091 James BARNES (A.R.) – ‘D’ Company  

Stone: 13 a     Killed in Action:  24 August 1914      Age: 34

Personal: James was born in June 1880 at Stockport Road, Saddleworth, Cheshire, the oldest son of Matthew (Weaver) and Elizabeth Ann Barnes (1881 Census RG 11/4362)  He had three younger siblings, George, Harriett and Joseph. (1901 Census RG 13/3798).

At the time of his enlistment in February 1903, aged 20 years 3 months, James stood 5 ft. 5 ins tall (1.65 m.), weighed 9 st., (57.15 kgs.) had a ‘fair‘ complexion, brown eyes and light brown hair. His stated religion was Church of England.

James’ father. Matthew, died on 3rd December 1906 and before the 1911 Census (RG 14/) the family had moved to 14 Wellington Street, Ashton-under-Lyne, Lancashire. James, Harriett and Joseph were living there with their widowed mother, Elizabeth. [By then, of course, James had served his 8 years on active service with the Cheshires and was now employed as a General Labourer“.]

The “Register of Soldiers’ Effects” shows that £3 10s 8d [£3.53 – equivalent to about £250 today – 2020] was returned to Elizabeth (James’ mother) in January 1916. In August 1919 she also received a War Gratuity of £5 [about £225 today].

With effect from 13th June 1916 Elizabeth received a pension of 10s [50p] per week, rising incrementally to 16s [80p] by August 1922. (i.e. about £35 -> £40 today) She was living at 180 Katherine Street, Ashton-under-Lyne, when she died on 13th June 1925.

Pt. Barnes’ name on the Memorial

Military Service: James enlisted in the Cheshire Regiment at Hyde, Cheshire, on 9th February 1903. His Short Service Attestation Papers show that he was already serving with the 4th (Territorial) Battalion.

On 6th May 1905 he extended his service “For such period as will serve 8 years with the Colours“.

He served in India from 20th September 1904 until the end of his service, returning on 16th March 1911. Accordingly, therefore, James was transferred to the Reserve List on 17th March 1911 – initially to Section A, and a year later relegated to Section B.Read more about ..

As a Reservist, on 5th August 1914, he was recalled at the outbreak of War, and sailed from Belfast with the 1st Battalion, entering France on 16th August, confirmed by his Medal Index Card. As a member of ‘D’ Company, James  saw action at Audregnies on the 24th August, on the right flank under Captain E.R. Jones or Captain W.S. Rich.

At the end of the day James was one of 20 men from his Company killed in action and has no known grave. [It is, of course, possible that he is one of the men of the Battalion buried in Audregnies Cemetery, “Known Unto God“.] In total James had served 11 years 180 days with the Colours.

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Private 7700 Alfred James BELSHAW (A.R.) –     ‘D’ Company  

Stone: 13 a     Killed in Action:  24 August 1914      Age: 32

Personal: Alfred was born in the December quarter 1882 at Syston, Leicester. He was the son of John N. and Sarah (née Walker) Belshaw and had 3 older siblings, William Joseph, Ethel and Margaret, and a younger sister, Florence Daisy. [1891 Census RG 12/2523]. In 1881 the family was living at Handsworth Villa, Barkby, Leicestershire.

In 1901 [Census RG 13/2984] the family were still in Barkby, at Maiden Street. In the June quarter 1910 Alfred married Ada (?) and the Census of the following year [RG 14/19163] shows them living at Wanlip Road, Barkby, with their daughter, Ethel Mary (born 25th February 1911). Alfred was employed as a “Manager of a Coal Wharf“. A son, John Charles, followed on 25th June 1912.

From June 1916 Ada was granted a Pension of 18s 6d per week [£0.92 – equivalent to about £65 today – 2020]. The “Register of Soldiers’ Effects” shows that £6 0s 9d [£6.04 – about £415 today – 2020] was returned to Ada in April 1916. In September 1919 she also received a War Gratuity of £5 [about £225 today]. By that time she had re-married, becoming Ada Potts, and was living at The Fosse, Dipton, nr. Leicester.

Pt Belshaw’s name on the Memorial

Military Service: Alfred enlisted in the Cheshire Regiment at Leicester. His Service Papers have not survived but Joseph’s Service Number (7700) suggests an enlistment date in mid-1904, on a 3 years Active + 9 years Reserve engagement.

There is every reason to suppose Alfred would have done the same, which would have entailed overseas service in India and would have been entered on the ‘Reserve List’ in 1907.

As a Reservist Alfred was recalled at the outbreak of War and joined the Battalion in Londonderry before sailing from Belfast on the SS Massilia for Le Havre on 14th August 1914. He arrived in France on 16th August, confirmed by his Medal Index Card. As a member of ‘D’ Company, Alfred  saw action at Audregnies on the 24th August, on the right flank under Captain E.R. Jones or Captain W.S. Rich.

By the end of that day Alfred was one of 20 men from his Company killed in action and has no known grave. [It is, of course, possible that he is one of the men of the Battalion buried in Audregnies Cemetery, “Known Unto God“.]

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Private 6771 William BULLOCK (A.R.) –  ‘C’ Coy  

Stone: 13 a     Killed in Action:  24 August 1914      Age: 31

Personal: William was born at Nantwich, Cheshire, in the September quarter 1882. He was the son of Joseph and Sarah (née Tilley) Bullock and had an older sister, Mary, and 3 younger siblings, James (see Footnote below), Eliza and Thomas. William father, Joseph, died in May 1889 (buried on 14th) at Nantwich, aged 31.

In 1891 (Census RG 12/2856) widowed Sarah and her family was living at 7 Second Woods Street, Nantwich, and working as a “Tailoress“. Later that year she remarried Joseph Smith at St Mary & St Nicholas’ Church, Nantwich, and they had 3 more children, Martha Ellen, Sarah and Leah.

10 years later (1901 Census RG 13/3362) Sarah (still working as a Tailor’s Machinist“) and all 8 children were living at 10 Beam Street, Nantwich. 18 year old William was employed as a “General Labourer“. [The following year – see below – he enlisted in the 2nd Battalion Cheshire Regiment.]

At the time of his enlistment, aged 19, in 1902, William stood 5 ft. 5 ins. [1.65 m.] tall, weighed 9 st. 4 lbs. [59 kgs.] and had a ‘fresh‘ complexion, blue eyes and light brown hair. His stated religion was ‘C. of E.‘.

On 18th August 1907, 2 years after his full-time Army career ended, William married Jane Hassall and in 1911 (Census RG 14/16233) William, employed as a “Goods Railway Porter“, and Jane were living at Heath Lane Crossing, Whitchurch, Shropshire. Their daughter, Florence, was born on 31st March 1912.

With effect from 16th April 1915 Jane was awarded a Pension of 15 shillings a week for herself and Florence. [15 s. = 75p – equivalent to about £50 today – 2020]. On 8th October 1916 Jane re-married Pt. 17970 Bernard Beards, Cheshire Regiment, and received the remarriage gratuity of £50 3s 9d [£50.19 – about £3,450 today]. Bernard had joined the B.E.F. in France on 26th September 1915. He was wounded and received the ‘Silver War Badge‘, before being discharged on 31st August 1918.

Pt. Bullock’s name on the Memorial

Military Service: William enlisted in the 2nd Battalion, Cheshire Regiment at Crewe, Cheshire, on 24th February 1902. He had previously been in the 4th (Territorial) Battalion.

Whilst based at Aldershot he had a few brushes with the law, being absent without leave twice and was charged with desertion in September 1903.

Between 20th September 1904 and 26th January 1907 William served in India, before being discharged to the Reserve on 28th January 1907.

As a Reservist William was recalled at the outbreak of War and joined the Battalion in Londonderry on 14th August 1914, before sailing from Belfast on the SS Massilia for Le Havre on 14th August 1914. He arrived in France on 16th August, confirmed by his Medal Index Card. As a member of ‘C’ Company, he  saw action at Audregnies on the 24th August, on the right of the line under Captain W.E.L.R. Dugmore.

William’s Service Papers state that on 2nd September 1914 he was “Missing from Bn. since 24.8.14 in the Field“. Enquiries were then made to see if he was a Prisoner of War, before his death was confirmed by virtue of “Identity Disc“.

William was one of 12 men from his Company killed in action and now has no known grave. [It is, of course, possible that he is one of the men of the Battalion buried in Audregnies Cemetery, “Known Unto God“.]

William’s younger brother, Pt. 61942 James Bullock, was transferred from the Army Reserve to 15th Battalion, Cheshire Regiment on 11th December 1915.

He was recalled on 12th March 1917 and transferred to the 1st Battalion, joining his unit in France on 24th September 1917. He was posted again to 204th Field Company, Royal Engineers, on 10th January 1918.

James had married Mary Elizabeth Prince on 18th May 1904 and they had 3 children, Doris, Gladys and Wilfred.

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Private 10266 Samuel BURKHILL –  ‘B’ Company  

Stone: 13 a     Killed in Action:  24 August 1914      Age: 20

Personal: According to his Service Papers Samuel was born on 11th October 1893 at Frodsham, Cheshire.  He was the son of Samuel (Contractor’s Labourer) and Martha (née Robinson) Burkhill and had 4 older brothers and sisters, Peter (see Footnote below), Robert, Alice and Lucy, and 2 younger sisters, Mary and Eva.

In 1901 (Census RG 13/3337) the family was living at the Five Crosses, Frodsham, Cheshire.

In 1911 (Census RG 14/21645) 17 year old Sam was still living with his parents and 2 younger sisters at Five Crosses, and was employed as a ‘Cable Maker‘ at The British Insulated and Helsby Cable Coy.‘.

Samuel was tall for the time and stood 5 ft. 10 ins. [1.78 m.] at the time of his enlistment in November 1913, aged 20 years 38 days. He weighed 10 st. 3 lbs. [64.9 kgs.], had a ‘fresh‘ complexion, blue-grey eyes and auburn hair.

The “Register of Soldiers’ Effects” shows that £2 5s 1d [£2.25 – about £155 today – 2020] was returned to Samuel Snr. in January 1916. In August 1919 he also received a War Gratuity of £5 [about £225 today]. With effect from 6th November 1918 Samuel’s mother, Martha, also received a Pension of 5 shillings per week. [£0.25 – about £13 today]

Pt. Burkhill’s name on the Memorial

Military Service:  Samuel enlisted in the 1st Battalion, Cheshire Regiment at Chester on 18th November 1913. He was already serving in the 5th (Earl of Chester’s) Territorial Battalion [Private 1279], into which he enlisted on 27th January 1911.

The Terms of Service with the 1st Battalion were 7 years Active + 5 years Reserve engagement. Samuel was posted to the 1st Battalion in Ireland on 17th January 1914.

As a serving soldier stationed with the Battalion in Londonderry Samuel sailed from Belfast on the SS Massilia for Le Havre on 14th August 1914. He arrived in France on 16th August, confirmed by his Medal Index Card. As a member of ‘B’ Company he saw action at Audregnies on the 24th August, in the centre of the action under Captain J.L. Shore.

After just 9 days in France Samuel was one of 14 men from his Company killed in action and has no known grave. [It is, of course, possible that he is one of the men of the Battalion buried in Audregnies Cemetery, “Known Unto God“.] In total Samuel had served just 280 days with the 1st Battalion plus 2 years 275 days with the Territorial (5th) Battalion.

Samuel’s older brother, Pt. G/23011 Peter Burkhill, served with the 10th Battalion, Queen’s (Royal West Surrey) Regiment.

Pt. Peter Burkhill was killed in action on 18th August 1917 and is buried in Grave II. B. 7. Bertenacre Military Cemetery.  

The Battalion War Diary for that day reads: “On the evening of 18th a hostile ‘plane dropped a bomb at 9.45 p.m. in the middle of the camp causing the following casualties: Officers: 1 killed; O.R.: 38 killed, 7 Died of wounds; 61 wounded. There were no lights on in the camp at the time and the majority of the men were killed lying down in their tents asleep.

Peter was born in the December quarter 1882. In the December quarter 1904 he married Mary Agnes Harding and they had 4 children, Edward (born September 1905), Eva (b. December 1907), Mary (February 1914) and Hilda (January 1916).

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Private 10088 John BYRNE –  ‘D’ Company  

Stone: 13 a    Killed in Action:  24 August 1914      Age: 20

Personal: John was born in 1894 in Chorlton, Manchester, the eldest son of  John and Violetta (née Jackson) Byrne. In 1901 (Census RG 13/3701) he was living at 10 Rosamond Terrace, Hulme, Manchester, the home of his maternal grandparents, John and Eliza Jackson. The Census also shows he had 2 younger brothers, Thomas and Albert Edward.

The 1911 Census (RG 14/23859) shows the family at the same address with 2 more younger siblings, Walter and Violet Marian. John was employed as a “Junior Clerk“. Later that year John Snr. died and in the March quarter 1914 Violetta re-married Soloman Moryoseph, in Chorlton Register Office.

[N.B. Pte. 202284 Soloman Moryoseph, 2/5th S. Lancs. Regiment, was killed in action on 2nd April 1917. He is buried in Grave H.44, Cambrin Cemetery.]

The “Register of Soldiers’ Effects” shows that £2 11s 9d [£2.59 – about £180 today – 2020] was returned to John’s mother, Violetta Moryoseph, in February 1916. In July 1919 she also received a War Gratuity of £5 [about £225 today]. At the time she was living at 110 Higher Chatham Street, Chorlton-on- Medlock, Manchester. In October 1917 she also received a Pension of £1 8s 9d per week [£1.43 – about £82 today] in respective of her second husband and his and her youngest children.

Pt. Byrne’s name on the Memorial

Military Service:  John enlisted in the 1st Battalion, Cheshire Regiment at Hyde, Cheshire. His Attestation Papers are not available, but his Service Number (10088) would indicate that John enlisted Feb/March 1913. (e.g. Pte. 10064 J. Evans enlisted at Nantwich, Cheshire, on 3rd February.)

All enlistments into the 1st Battalion at this time were on a 7 years Active Service + 5 Reserve basis.

As a serving soldier stationed with the Battalion in Londonderry, John sailed from Belfast on the SS Massilia for Le Havre on 14th August 1914. He arrived in France on 16th August, confirmed by his Medal Index Card. As a member of ‘D’ Company he saw action at Audregnies on the 24th August, on the right of the action under Captain E.R. Jones.

After just 9 days in France Samuel was one of 20 men from his Company killed in action and has no known grave. [It is, of course, possible that he is one of the men of the Battalion buried in Audregnies Cemetery, “Known Unto God“.]

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Private 9060 William BYRNE –  ‘B’ Company  

Stone: 13 a     Killed in Action:  24 August 1914      Age: 23

Personal: According to his Attestation Papers William was born at St Laurence’s, Birkenhead, in February 1891. He was the son of William (Dock Worker ?) & Mary Byrne. William had a sister, Lucy, who was resident at the “Catholic Blind Asylum, Liverpool“. 

At the time of his enlistment, aged 17, in 1908, William stood 5 ft. 3½ ins. [1.61 m.], weighed 8 st. 3 lbs. [52.2 kgs.].

The “Register of Soldiers’ Effects” shows that an amount £10 11s 11d [£10.60 – about £725 today – 2020] was returned to William’s mother, Mary, in January 1916. In April 1920 she also received a War Gratuity of £5 [about £225 today]. At that time she was living at 9 Sandon Street, Liverpool, 8.

Pt. Byrne’s name on the Memorial

Military Service:  William enlisted in the 1st Battalion, Cheshire Regiment, at Chester Cheshire, on 6th August 1908, aged 17 years 6 months. he was already serving with the 3rd (Reserve) Battalion, attested 4th March 1908.

He was posted to the 1st Battalion a month later. All enlistments into the 1st Battalion at this time were on a 7 years Active Service + 5 Reserve basis.

On 24th February 1914 William was posted back to the 3rd Battalion, but recalled to the 1st on the 8th August, following the declaration of War.

As a serving soldier stationed with the Battalion in Londonderry William sailed from Belfast on the SS Massilia for Le Havre on 14th August 1914. He arrived in France on 16th August, confirmed by his Medal Index Card. As a member of ‘B’ Company he saw action at Audregnies on the 24th August, in the centre of the action under Captain J.L. Shore.

After just 9 days in France William was one of 14 men from his Company killed in action and has no known grave. [It is, of course, possible that he is one of the men of the Battalion buried in Audregnies Cemetery, “Known Unto God“.] In total he served 6 years 21 days with the Colours.

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Private 8069 Gerald COPPOCK –  ‘C’ Company  

Stone: 13 a     Killed in Action:  24 August 1914      Age: 26

Personal: Gerald was born at 21 Forest Street, Witton-cum-Twambrooks, Northwich, Cheshire, in the December quarter 1885 (baptised 27th December).  He was the son of Charles (Wheelwright) and Eliza (née Morgan) Coppock. He had 5 older brothers and sisters, Charles, Bertie, William, Sarah and Alan (see Footnote below), and 6 younger, Clifford (see Footnote below), Warren, Fred, Mabel, Martha and Alice (1901 Census RG 13/3342).

117 Middlewich Road, Northwich

That Census shows the family living at 117 Middlewich Road, Northwich, Cheshire, with Gerald employed as a “Gardener’s Labourer“. The family were at the same address in 1911, although Gerald had moved away to join the Cheshire Regiment. As the modern picture (left) shows, this seems a very small house for such a large family. 

At the time his enlistment in 1905 Gerald stood 5 ft. 9 ins [1.75 m.] tall, weighed 10 st. [63.5 kgs.] and had a ‘fresh’ complexion, brown eyes and brown hair. (“After 6 months service and gymnastic courses” he had gained 10 lbs. [4.5 kgs.].)

The “Register of Soldiers’ Effects” shows that an amount £9 15s 9d [£9.79 – about £560 today – 2020] was returned to Gerald’s father, Charles, in August 1917. In August 1919 he also received a War Gratuity of £5 [about £225 today].

Pt. Coppock’s name on the Memorial

Military Service:  Gerald enlisted in the 1st Battalion, Cheshire Regiment, at Northwich, Cheshire, on 29th November 1905, aged 20 years. His Terms of Service were 9 years Active + 3 years Reserve. He was employed as “Acting Drummer“.

On 9th March 1906 Gerald was posted to the 1st Battalion, but posted to the 2nd on 19th December 1906, for deployment to India where he remained until the 5th March 1914.

At the end of his ‘Active’ period of service Gerald was transferred to the ‘B’ Reserve on 10th March 1914, then to the ‘A’ Reserve three weeks later. Read more about ..

He was a “1st Class Shot”, but “Not trained on machine gun“. His conduct was logged as: “Exemplary“. On discharge Gerald stated he wished his future employment to be: “Prison Warder or Policeman“.

As a Reservist Gerald was recalled at the outbreak of War and joined the Battalion in Londonderry on 14th August 1914, before sailing from Belfast on the SS Massilia for Le Havre on 14th August 1914. He arrived in France on 16th August, confirmed by his Medal Index Card. As a member of ‘C’ Company, he  saw action at Audregnies on the 24th August, on the right of the line under Captain W.E.L.R. Dugmore.

After just 9 days in France William was one of 12 men from his Company killed in action and has no known grave. [It is, of course, possible that he is one of the men of the Battalion buried in Audregnies Cemetery, “Known Unto God“.] In total he had served 8 years 271 days with the Colours. Initially he was reported missing on the 24th and in October 1914 his father wrote to the War Office requesting news of his son. Finally “Evidence of death received by W.O. from an unofficial source“.

Gerald’s older brother, Pt. 25024 Alan Coppock, enlisted in the Cheshire Regiment on 19th January 1915 and was posted to the 10th Bn.

Gerald’s younger brother, Pt. 26881 Clifford Coppock, enlisted in the Cheshire Regiment on 7th June 1915 and was posted to the 14th Battalion.

On 5th November 1915 Clifford was posted to the 8th Battalion in Egypt and Mesopotamia, before another redeployment to Ranikill, India, on 5th March 1918 where he remained until his transfer to the South Staffs. Regiment (Pt. 47402) on 7th May 1918. Clifford was discharged on 3rd June 1919.

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