2nd Battle of Ypres

Officers, N.C.O.s & Men of the 1st Battalion, Commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial, Ypres

SECOND BATTLE OF YPRES:

The Menin Gate Memorial commemorates 54,326 British and Commonwealth soldiers (except New Zealand) who fell in the fighting in the Ypres salient from November 1914  and who have no known grave. 

The Menin Gate Memorial lists the names of 4 Officers and 66 NCOs and men of the 1st Battalion who were “Old Contemptibles“.

There are also 5 men of the 1/6th Battalion who reinforced the 1st in December, all of whom have no known grave.

The 1st Battalion was withdrawn to Frezenburg on the 4th May 1915. It was still very short of Officers and Lt. Col. A. de C. Scott, Capt. Savage and Lt. W. Mills were sent to join it from the 2nd Battalion.

The 1st Battalion’s action around Hill 60 between 4th – 8th May 1915, in more details on Lt.-Col. Arthur de Courcy Scott’s page.

Of the 74 Cheshires’ men (i.e. 69 from 1st Battalion and 5 from 1st/6th) that are commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial, FIFTEEN were of the original 1st Battalion who sailed for France in August. TEN of these were killed in action during the First Battle of Ypres in November 1914.

The TEN men from the original 1st Battalion who were killed in action in November 1914

The remaining FIVE had survived the Battles at Audregnies, La Bassée and First Ypres, only to be killed later in the War – e.g. 2nd Battle of Ypres, April/May 1915.

CLICK the names below to read more about these five men from the original 1st Battalion Old Contemptibles.

 

Lieutenant Norman Alexander NEWSON –  3rd (Reserve) Battalion, Attached ‘B’ Company          

Memorial: Panel 19    Killed in Action: 18 February 1915      Age: 23

Personal: Norman was born in the December quarter 1891 at Nevern Mansions, Kensington, London, the younger son of Arthur Bell (Architect) and Hester Kate (née Fussell) Newson. He had an older brother, Thomas A. (1891 Census RG 12/33). However the family cannot be found on the 1901 Census.

In 1911 he was living at home at Danehurst, Sylvann Way, Bognor, and gave his occupation as ‘Student‘. (Census RG 14/5377.) Norman was educated at Middleton School, Bognor, and Clifton House School, Eastbourne.

After his death, in July and October 1915, Norman’s total effects were returned to his father, Arthur. The total amounted to £74 6s 6d (£74.32 – equivalent to about £6000 today – 2020).

Lt. Newson’s name on the Menin Gate Memorial

Military Service: Norman’s Army records are unavailable, but ‘Roll of Honour‘ states that he was gazetted, on probation, to the Cheshire Regiment in April 1912. His rank (2nd Lt.) was confirmed in December 1912. He was promoted to Lieutenant in May 1913.

His Medal Index Card shows that as a Officer in the Special Reserve (3rd) Battalion he was recalled and moved with the Battalion at the outbreak of War and entered France with the rest of the Battalion on 16th August 1914.

He fought on the left of the line at Audregnies under Captain J. L.Shore and also survived the actions at La Bassée and Nonne Boschon (First Ypres).

On 1st September 1915 Norman had been slightly wounded. During a rearguard action at Crépy he had refused to retire without C.O.’s orders even when troops on his right and left had retired. Nevertheless, he got his men away safely in spite of his wound and led them 12 miles to the next billet at Nanteuil where he transferred to 14th Field Ambulance.

After a short period at home to recover, Norman returned to the front with the 3rd (Service) Battalion in January 1915. The date that Norman was killed in action was recorded as 18th February 1915. That day the Battalion War Diary reads: ‘H.Q. Lindenhoek – Bn. in trenches. Marched to Wulverghen and took over ‘C’ Section from 9th (Q.V.E.) London Regt.. No additional entry listing any casualties.

Norman’s parents received condolence letters from his C.O. and Company commander, the latter saying: “He died doing his duty as he always did“.

read more about the life of Lieutenant Norman Alexander NEWSON and his family.

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Sergeant 7116 Thomas Edward BEBBINGTON (A.R.)     –    ‘A’ Company         

Memorial: Panel 19    Killed in Action: 18 April 1915      Age: 32

Personal: When Thomas commenced work with the ‘London and North Western Railway Co.‘  (crest right) in January 1897, his date of birth was recorded as 30th April 1882. He was born at Wrenbury, Cheshire, the eldest son of William (a Railway Labourer) and Hannah (née Bradley) Bebbington.

He had an older sister, Annie, and three younger brothers, William, George and Frank, and two younger sisters, Nellie and Ethel. In 1891 (Census RG 12/2858) the family was living at Sproston Wood, Wrenbury.

In February 1897 Thomas’ father, William, died (buried on 7th February) and Hannah re-married, Edward Hamilton (Groom), in December quarter 1898. The 1901 Census (RG 13/3358) Edward, Hannah and Hannah’s children, plus Ada Hamilton (Edward’s daughter) were living at 39 Shepherd Street, Coppenhall Woods, Cheshire.

At the time of his enlistment in 1903 Thomas was employed as a Labourer. He was 5′ 4″ tall (1.63 m.), weighed 138 lbs. (9 stone 12 lbs) had a ‘fresh‘ complexion, grey eyes and light brown hair. His stated religion was Church of England.

St Paul’s Church, Crewe

On 22nd June 1907 Thomas married Marcella McKelvey at St Paul’s Church, Crewe (left), and they lived at 34 Sandbach Street, Crewe, Cheshire.

In 1911 (Census RG 14/21773) they were living at 42 Furber Street, Crewe, Cheshire, and Thomas was employed as a “Steam Crane Driver“, employed by the London and North-western Railway Company.

On 20th November 1915, after Thomas’ death, Marcella was awarded a Pension of £1 0s 6d (£1.03) for herself and the three children, Harry (born 29th September 1908), Thomas (b. 13th June 1911) and William John (b. 12th August 1914). [This would be equivalent to about £80 per week today – 2020.]

She also had his effects returned to her in October 1915, amounting to £12 18s 2d (£12.91 – about £1050 today) and also in August 1919 a War Gratuity of £8 (£370 today). At that time she was living at 34 Sandbach Street, Crewe.

Sgt. Bebbington’s name on the Menin Gate Memorial

Military Service: Thomas enlisted into the 2nd Battalion at Crewe, Cheshire, on 11th March 1903 aged (stated) 20 yrs 11 mths.  He was already serving in the 4th Battalion which had seen service in the South African War.

His terms of service were 3 + 9 (i.e. 3 years active service + 9 years reserve). He received two posting in 1903 and 04, initially to Aldershot and on 8th October 1904 to Coloba, India.

Thomas was transferred to the Army Reserve List ‘A’ on 26th April 1906 and Reserve List ‘B’ a year later. 

His Medal Index Card shows that as a Reservist he was recalled to the Regiment at the outbreak of War but Thomas did not enter France with the rest of the Battalion on 16th August 1914, following on five days later. This could have been for compassionate reasons as his 3rd son, William John, was born on the 12th. It is possible that he was one of the 90 reinforcement who joined the 1st Battalion under Lieutenant Hartford at 4 p.m. on 5th September (War Diary).

He was promoted to (paid) Lance Corporal on 11th September 1914; Acting Corporal on 3rd October 1914 and Acting Sergeant on 27th November 1914. In December he spent two weeks in Hospital suffering from rheumatism.

He was killed in action on 18th April 1915, during the Second Battle of Ypres. Including his reserve service he had spent a total of 12 years 43 days with the Regiment. The War Diary for that day shows the 1st Battalion in trenches 46-50; 51; 495 and 505 at Zillebeke. On the 17th the Diary records: “Hill 60 blown up and occupied by 13th Brigade“.

The following day: “Fresh attack by 13th Brigade on Hill 60 at 6.00 p.m., assault successful“. Two other men of the 1st Battalion died alongside Thomas, Pte. 9349 Thomas Gibson and Pte. 11389 Isaac Littlemore. Both Thomas and Thomas Gibson have no known grave and are commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial. Pte. Littlemore is buried in Bedford House Cemetery, close to the grave of Captain Thomas Laurence FROST (Adjt. 1st Batt.), who was killed in action a month later.

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Private 10265 James HOROBIN  – ‘D’ Company          

Memorial: Panel 22    Killed in Action: 7 May 1915      Age: 21

Personal: According to his enlistment papers James was born on 6th December 1893 at Ancoats, Manchester, the fifth (of six) children of Joseph and Catherine (née Rowan) Horobin. He had two older sisters, Mary and Catherine, two older brothers, Joseph and Richard, and a younger brother, Thomas. (After the War the family was living at 4 Wragby Street, Queen’s Road, Miles Platting, Manchester.)

At the time of his enlistment he was employed as a Coal Miner at New Moss Colliery, where he had worked for about 3 months. Before that he worked at the Bradford Colliery, Manchester (left), for about 9 months.

He was 5′ 3″ tall (1.61 m.), weighed 130 lbs. (9 stone 4 lbs) had a ‘pale‘ complexion, grey-blue eyes and brown hair. His stated religion was Church of England.

There is no record of James marrying or having any children. His father, as next of kin, had his effects returned to him in September 1915, amounting to £9 9s 4d (£9.47 – equivalent to about £765 today) and also in January 1920 a War Gratuity of £5 (about £200 today). At that time James’ surviving family were living at 14 Wragby Street, Queen’s Road, Miles Platting, Manchester.

Pt. Horobin’s name on the Menin Gate Memorial

Military Service: James enlisted into the 1st Battalion at Hyde, Cheshire on 14th November 1913 aged 19 yrs 333 days. His terms of service were 7 + 5 (i.e. 7 years active service + 5 years reserve). He was initially posted to Chester on 19th November 1913, but at some stage would have to transferred to Londonderry to join the rest of the Battalion.

His Medal Index Card shows that as a regular soldier he moved with the Battalion at the outbreak of War and entered France with the rest of the Battalion on 16th August 1914.

He fought on the right of the line at Audregnies under Captain E. R. Jones and also survived the actions at La Bassée and Nonne Boschon (First Ypres).

He was killed in action on 7th May 1915, during the Second Battle of Ypres at a “Place not stated“. Although the Battalion’s attack on Hill 60 was on the 5th, James and 17 of his fellow soldiers were killed in action on the 7th. In total he had served for 1 year 175 days with the Regiment (275 days in England and 265 in France).

The 1st Battalion was taking part in the “Battle of Hill 60“. In the first week of May 1915 the Battalion lost 41 men killed in action, including its C.O. Lt. Col. Arthur De Courcy SCOTT killed on the 5th and buried in Grave H.3., Zillebeke Churchyard.

The Battalion War Diary records that it was stationed in the: “Casemates in Ypres and École de Bien Faisance”. The next three days were spent “.. in Brigade Reserve”, but on 5th May it was: “Called out at 8.00 p.m. to move up to support the trenches, Hill 60, trenches 40, 43 & 45 occupied by the enemy. Arrived LARCH WOOD at RAILWAY CUTTING at about 10.20 a.m., drove some of the enemy from vicinity of Larch Wood and 41 and 42 support trenches.”

[N.B.Casemates’ were the tunnels, passageways and rooms built into the ramparts and bastions by the French military engineer Sébastien Le Prestre, Seigneur de Vauban (1633-1707), during the French occupation in the 1680s, were used by French and British troops as shelters, accommodation, medical dressing stations and headquarters from October 1914.]

The Diary continued: “In the evening Bn. occupied trenches as follows: ‘A’ Company in LARCH WOOD, ‘B’ Coy. in trench 42, with one platoon in 40, ‘C’ Coy in 41 less one platoon in DUMP; ‘D’ Company with Bedfords and Norfolks. The K.O.S.B. [Kings Own Scottish Borderers] attacked Hill 60 but without success.

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Corporal 6589 Richard HUSON – ‘A’ Company          

Memorial: Panel 21    Killed in Action: 8 May 1915      Age: 31

Personal: Richard was born on 2nd August 1882 at Laurence Street, Liverpool (right), the eldest son of John (Seaman) and Mary (née Shaw) (Charwoman). He had an older sister, Elizabeth Alice, and a younger brother, John. In 1891 (Census RG 12/2902) the family was living at Tenement 8, 26c Hornby Road, Liverpool.

Ten years later (1901 Census RG 13/3413) Mary and the 2 boys (maybe father was at sea) were at 8/2 Lower Chalk Street, Liverpool. Both sons were employed as a “General Labourer“. This was the occupation and address Richard gave at the time of his enlistment.

By the time of the 1911 Census (RG 14/34980) Richard was serving with the 2nd Battalion, Cheshire Regiment, stationed at The Ridge, Jubbalpore, India, and was designated a “Cook“.

Gildarts Gardens Liverpool. (Cheap tenements)

There is no record of Richard marrying or having any children and his Pension Ledger shows a pension of 3 shillings (15p) per week awarded to his mother, Mary, from July 1916. This rose to 14s 5d (72p) by 1921, but Mary died on 28th November 1921.

At the time of the award the surviving family were living at 21 Gildarts Gardens, Liverpool (pictured left). [N.B. 15p and 72p would equate to about £10 and £35 respectively today – 2020.]

In April 1916 Richard’s father, John, as next of kin, had his effects returned to him, amounting to £2 19s 7d (£2.98 – equivalent to about £205 today) and also in August 1919 a War Gratuity of £6 (about £280 today).

Cpl. Huson’s name on the Menin Gate Memorial

Military Service: Richard enlisted in the Cheshire Regiment at Liverpool, from his service number probably in June 1901, aged 18. Currently his Army records are unavailable, probably destroyed in Second World War bombing.

As a Reservist he was recalled to the 1st Battalion at the outbreak of War and his Medal Card shows he entered France on 16th August.

He fought under Captain A.J.L. Dyer on the left flank of the Battalion’s action at Audregnies on 24th August and also survived the actions at La Bassée and Nonne Boschon (First Ypres).

Richard was reported ‘Missing‘, later ‘Accepted as ..‘ killed in action on 8th May 1915, during the Second Battle of Ypres. Although the Battalion’s attack on Hill 60 was on the 5th, Richard was one of 6 men killed in action on the 8th.

On 5th May the Battalion was: “Called out at 8.00 p.m. to move up to support the trenches, Hill 60, trenches 40, 43 & 45 occupied by the enemy. Arrived LARCH WOOD at RAILWAY CUTTING at about 10.20 a.m., drove some of the enemy from vicinity of Larch Wood and 41 and 42 support trenches.”

The Diary continued: “In the evening Bn. occupied trenches as follows: ‘A’ Company in LARCH WOOD, ‘B’ Coy. in trench 42, with one platoon in 40, ‘C’ Coy in 41 less one platoon in DUMP; ‘D’ Company with Bedfords and Norfolks. The K.O.S.B. [Kings Own Scottish Borderers] attacked Hill 60 but without success.”

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Private 10106 James KINGSTON – ‘B’ Company          

Memorial: Panel 22    Killed in Action: 7 May 1915      Age: 20

Personal: James was born in September 1894 (baptised on 9th), the eldest son of James and Harriett (née Strawson) Kingston of Ardwick, Manchester (18 Garden Street, in 1901 – Census: RG 13/3674). He had a younger brother, George. (He also had stepbrothers from his mother’s first marriage.) In 1911 (Census RG 14/24298) the family was living at 8 Butterworth Street, Bradford, Manchester.

There is no record of James marrying or having any children. His Pension was paid first to his mother and, after her death, to his father James. In July 1919 a War Gratuity of £5 (about £230 today) was paid to Harriett.

Pt. Kingston’s name on the Menin Gate Memorial

Military Service: James enlisted in the Cheshire Regiment at Chester, from his service number probably in June 1913, aged 18. (e.g. Pt. 10112 J W Connolly, enlisted at Birkenhead on 8th June 1913). Currently James’ Army records are unavailable, probably destroyed in Second World War bombing.

[N.B. CWGC has James Service Number as 10108, all other documents show it as 10106]

His Medal Index Card shows that as a regular soldier he moved with the Battalion at the outbreak of War and entered France with the rest of the Battalion on 16th August 1914. He fought on the left of the line at Audregnies under Captain J. L. Shore and also survived the actions at La Bassée and Nonne Boschon (First Ypres).

He was killed in action on 7th May 1915, during the Second Battle of Ypres. Although the Battalion’s attack on Hill 60 was on the 5th, James and 17 of his fellow soldiers were killed in action on the 7th.

On 5th May the Battalion was: “Called out at 8.00 p.m. to move up to support the trenches, Hill 60, trenches 40, 43 & 45 occupied by the enemy. Arrived LARCH WOOD at RAILWAY CUTTING at about 10.20 a.m., drove some of the enemy from vicinity of Larch Wood and 41 and 42 support trenches.”

The Diary continued: “In the evening Bn. occupied trenches as follows: ‘A’ Company in LARCH WOOD, ‘B’ Coy. in trench 42, with one platoon in 40, ‘C’ Coy in 41 less one platoon in DUMP; ‘D’ Company with Bedfords and Norfolks. The K.O.S.B. [Kings Own Scottish Borderers] attacked Hill 60 but without success.”

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Corporal 7085 Frank McCARTHY – Company n/k            Awards: D.C.M., Mentioned in Despatches 

Memorial: Panel 22    Killed in Action: 6 March 1915      Age: 30

Personal: Frank was born in Cork, Ireland, according to his service papers, in July 1884. However, Census Records suggest he was not born until 1887/8. His father was John McCarthy, but his mother’s name has not been found.

However, the 1891 Census (RG 12/621) 3 year old Frank and his 6 year old sister, Maggie, were living at 2 Princes Road, Richmond, Surrey, the home of their grandparents, John (Weaver) and Mary Sullivan. Enumerated at the same address is their widowed daughter, Norah Sullivan (Laundress), aged 24, so it is possible she is Frank’s mother, and his father, John, has died.

When he enlisted in February 1903 Frank stood 5 ft. 3½ ins. [1.61 m.] tall, weighed 10 st. 7 lbs. [54.9 kgs.], had a ‘fresh’ complexion, hazel eyes and brown hair. At that time he was employed as a “Compositor“.

On 2nd January 1907, 10 months after returning from Service in India, 19 year old Frank married 17 year old Rose Heatley, at St. Philip’s Church, Clerkenwell, London (left).

They lived at 31 Great Bath Street, Clerkenwell. They had three children, Florence Laura (born 18th March 1908), Francis Edwin (b. 5th August 1913) and Charles (b. 7th February 1915).

In 1911 (Census RG 14/701) Frank, Rose and eldest daughter, Florence, was living at 31 Wakefield Street, Hunter Street, London, and Frank was employed as a “Waste Paper Porter“.

In November 1915, after he had been killed in action, Frank’s wife, now known as ‘Rosina‘, had his effects returned to her, amounting to £31 4s 4d (£31.22 – equivalent to about £2500 today – 2020) and also in July 1919 a War Gratuity of £6 (about £280 today).

Pension Records show that with effect from 10th November 1915 ‘Rosina‘ was awarded a pension of £1 1s. (£1.05 – about £85 per week today). On 7th April 1917 she remarried Robert Brown, a discharged soldier. She was in receipt of the Remarriage Gratuity of £38 15s 11d  (£38.80 – about £2200 today). [N.B. War widows in receipt of a pension would receive a gratuity of one year’s pension if they remarried. At the same time their widow’s pension ceased. The pension for her children by the deceased serviceman would continue.]

Rosina died in the December quarter 1971 in Enfield, London.

Cpl. McCarthy’s name on the Menin Gate Memorial

Military Service: Frank enlisted in the Cheshire Regiment at Stratford on 5th February 1903, stated age 18 years 6 months. However, Census Records suggest he was not born until 1887/8, so was probably only 15 years old.

His Terms of Service were 3 + 9, i.e. 3 years ‘Active’ Service, followed by 9 years on the Reserve List.

After initial training he was posted to the 2nd Battalion, serving in India, between 20th September 1904 and 8th March 1906.

about this period in the Battalion.

On the 9th March, 0n his return to England, Frank was posted to the Reserve (“On the expiration of his Army Service“). Shortly after the outbreak of War, as a Reservist, Frank was recalled to the 1st Battalion, as his 2nd Battalion was still in India.

He was not in the Original Battalion that arrived in France on 16th August, but his Medal Index Card shows him arriving on 27th August – three days after the Battle of Audregnies. He could have been one of those recorded in the War Diary on 5th September 1914: “GAGNY – 4.00 p.m.  Reinforced by Lt Hartford, 1 Ches Regt. and 90 other ranks at 4 p.m.” Frank was promoted to Corporal on 11th September 1914.

Frank was ‘Mentioned‘ in Sir John French’s Despatch of 19th October 1914. He was also awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal (D.C.M.) the citation of which reads:

On 15th September, at Missy Sur Aisne, volunteered to fetch ammunition under fire, and at night, at the imminent risk of being shot by both friend and foe, assisted 2nd Lieutenant Atkinson to rejoin his company“. (London Gazette Issue 29009 published on 15th December 1914. Page 10786)

The Battalion War Diary for the 15th reads (in part): “MISSY – 6.00 a.m.  Norfolks and Bedfords reinforced us in Missy and an attack was ordered on Chivres Hill after the guns had shelled the lower slopes. Before this could take place Missy was shelled by the very heavy artillery brought up for the siege of Paris. 

The Battalion held on to all the defences of Missy till 6 p.m. when the Norfolks took over the Western half and there was a hot fire coming into the village from the woods on Chevres Hill all day. …”

[N.B. Lt. Henry Noel Atkinson (named above) was killed in action on 22nd October 1914. He was Mentioned in Despatches and awarded the D.S.O.]

The Battalion War Diary for the day Frank died, 6th March 1915, reads: “YPRES – Bn. Relieved by Norfolk Regt. and marched to Kruisstraat in Brigade Reserve.

Two days earlier the Battalion had marched to the trenches to take over from the Northumberland Fusiliers. In the two days it was in the trenches the Diary records no casualties.

CWGC Records, however, show that on 6th March Frank was one of 8 men of the 1st Battalion killed in action. The previous day, the 5th, 5 men of the Battalion died. Only 2 have a known grave; the others like Frank are commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial, Ypres.

[The Battalion returned to the trenches on the 9th and the Diary reported the death of 2/Lt. Charles Richard Griffin Vance (3rd Battalion)].

In total Frank served for 12 years and 30 days with the Colours, the last 192 days with the Battalion in France.

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Soldiers “Known Unto God”

Opening of the Menin Gate in 1928 (Source: Daily Mail)

In addition to the soldiers named above, during 1914 and early 1915 many reinforcements of Officers and men joined the Battalion to replace those lost (killed, wounded or captured) during the major engagements at Audregnies, La Bassée and Nonne Boschon

Sixty-seven of those replacements were killed in action or died of wounds and are now also commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial.

They are named below and by clicking the name link you can view their details of when they died.

Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial

CLICK on the Soldier's name to learn more
Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial  
Lt. Gerard Rupert Laurie ANDERSONCapt. George Bertram POLLOCK-HODSOLLLt. Harold Rolleston STABLES
L/Cpl. 8568 George ALLMANPt. 9578 Joseph Johnson Talbot ARMSTRONGPt. 10022 Fred BETTLEY
Pt. 9181 James BIRCHPt. 10120 Moses BOONPt. 10238 John BURKHILL
Pt. 10452 William CARRSgt. 9484 Thomas CARTERPt. 10304 Michael COMBOY
Pt. 6117 Joseph CORRIGANPt. 10423 Harry DAVIESPt. 6027 John DOYLE
Pt. 9479 William FALLONPt. 5840 John FOSTERPt. 6953 Ernest FROST
Pt. 10511 James Edwin GASHPt. 6451 John William GAUKROGERPt. 6833 Thomas GILBERT
Pt. 9371 Albert HARDYPt. 10538 Thomas HARTLEYPt. 9862 James Robert HAUGHTON
Pt. 6861 John HAWKINSPt. 6377 James HINESPt. 9119 Richard Edward HOUGHTON
Pt. 8948 William HOUGHTONL/Cpl. 10969 Thomas JONESPt. 10632 John KILGALLEN
Pt. 10260 Walter LALLYPt. 10059 Herbert MANLEYPt. 9881 Edward MARSHALL
L/Cpl. 5772 Joseph McGARRYPt. 9480 William Henry OGDENPt. 8264 Joseph OWEN
Pt. 10267 Alfred PARKERPt. 7233 Thomas PARSONSPt. 10079 William PATTIN
Pt. 10065 Joseph PEACHPte. 10302 William Edward PERKINSPt. 5968 John ROBERTS
Pt. 9213 William Stanley ROBERTSPt. 9889 Alexander ROSSPt. 10399 Leonard Victor SMITH
Pt. 6637 James SPENCERPt. 9995 Herbert TEDCASTLEPt. 10152 William THOMSON
Pt. 6135 Joseph WARBURTONPt. 6458 David WEBBPt. 8820 James WILLIAMS
Pt. 10516 Frederick WOODCOCKPt. 9910 George WRIGHT
Men of the 1st/6th Battalion
Pt. 8251 Cornelius BAMFORDPt. 1436 John CARRUTHERSPt. 2150 Henry ROBERTS
Pt. 1626 Benjamin TURNERPt. 1524 Walter WILLIAMSON

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Their name liveth for evermore

 

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